Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Winter

German researchers compile world’s largest inventory of known plant species

(German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig) Researchers at Leipzig University and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have compiled the world’s most comprehensive list of known plant species. It contains 1,315,562 names of vascular plants, thus extending the number by some 70,000 – equivalent to about 20%. The researchers have also succeeded in clarifying 181,000 hitherto unclear species names. The data set has now been published in Scientific Data. This marks the culmination of ten years of intensive research work.

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The Media’s Repeating Pattern Of Climate Holiday Fearmongering

A few days ago, the Washington Post ran a story that ranks as one of their worst-ever in terms of climate change alarmism. Titled “How climate change is complicating a Thanksgiving staple”, it tells the tale of woe about disappearing…

T. rex had huge growth spurts, but other dinos grew slow and steady

By cutting into dinosaur bones and analyzing the growth lines, a team of researchers discovered that T. rex and its closest relatives got big thanks to a huge growth spurt in adolescence, while its more distant cousins kept on growing a little bit every year throughout their lives.

Shift in atmospheric rivers could affect Antarctic sea ice, glaciers

Weather systems responsible for transporting moisture from the tropics to temperate regions in the Southern Hemisphere have been gradually shifting toward the South Pole for the past 40 years, a trend which could lead to increased rates of ice melt in Antarctica, according to new research.

Sorry, WaPo: Climate Change Is Not Hurting Cranberry Crops

The Washington Post published an article yesterday claiming climate change is devastating Massachusetts cranberry production and threatening to eliminate America’s Thanksgiving cranberry sauce. In related news, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is forecasting a record 2020 Massachusetts cranberry crop. The…

More children and youth drowning as warming temperatures create unstable lake ice

As winters become milder and lake ice less stable, more children and young adults are falling through the ice and fatally drowning, say researchers. A new study, which looked at 4,000 drownings in 10 countries, including Canada, Russia, Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States, found warming winter air temperatures were a good predictor of the number of drownings.

Predicting urban water needs

New Stanford research uses Zillow and census data combined with machine learning to identify residential water consumption based on housing characteristics. The approach could help cities better understand water use and design water-efficient communities.