Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Waste Management

Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years

(Terry Collins Assoc) The UN’s 3rd Global eWaste Monitor reports 53.6 million metric tonnes (Mt) of e-waste was produced last year — substantially more than the weight of all adults in Europe. Global e-waste has risen 21% by weight in just five years, fueled by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few repair options. In 2030 the world is projected to produce about 50% more e-waste per capita compared with 2014.

Study finds that plastic recycling from europe being dumped in Asian waters

(National University of Ireland Galway) New research from NUI Galway and the University of Limerick has for the first time quantified the volume of plastic from European countries (EU, UK, Switzerland and Norway) that contributes to ocean littering from exported recycling.

Wet wipes and sanitary products found to be microplastic pollutants in Irish waters

(National University of Ireland Galway) Researchers from Earth and Ocean Sciences and the Ryan Institute at NUI Galway have carried out a study on the contribution of widely flushed personal care textile products (wet wipes and sanitary towels) to the ocean plastic crisis.

The future is knocking: Global food production to be transformed using new technology

(University of Copenhagen) The world’s growing population will necessitate a 30-70% increase in food production over the next 3 decades. If we are to succeed, it will require a complete overhaul of the way we produce food. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, have now created an overview of solutions that include a number of new technologies that can collectively address this global challenge.

Hazardous waste or edible food?

(University of Vaasa) According to a new doctoral dissertation from the University of Vaasa, more drive and novel and creative solutions are needed in retailing to tackle bread waste. Grocery stores could reduce bread waste by making the most of technology, marketing methods and engagement.

Uranium chemistry and geological disposal of radioactive waste

(Diamond Light Source) A new paper to be published on Dec. 16 provides a significant new insight into our understanding of uranium biogeochemistry and could help with the UK’s nuclear legacy. The recent study is the first time that researchers have shown that a uranium-sulfide complex can form under conditions representative of a deep underground environment. This complex then transforms further into highly immobile uranium oxide nanoparticles.

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage

(University of Guelph) Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometres, the University of Guelph team prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste — important for Canadian nuclear industry looking to build its first geological repository.