Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Egg and sperm cell size evolved from competition

(Northwestern University) Using mathematical modeling, researchers considered a time very early in evolution when primordial species reproduced using external fertilization. In the model, bigger reproductive cells, or gametes, presented a competitive edge because they could hold more nutrients for a potential zygote. Smaller gametes, however, required fewer resources to make, which put less stress on the parent. Organisms evolved to specialize in large or small gametes, precursors to eggs and sperm.

Literature Review: Synthetic Turf carbon footprint, environmental, health, microplastics and biodiversity impacts

Hosken Reserve: grass oval used for soccer training, informal reacreation, off-lead dog exercise (Photo by John Englart) Abstract:  The conversion of a grass oval to synthetic turf at Hosken Reserve, Coburg North, is about a failure in transparency and consultation…

Annotated Bibliography: Synthetic Turf and Climate, health, biodiversity and microplastics pollution issues

Increasing use of synthetic surfaces and synthetic turf is problematic for Several reasons.  Synthetic turf is: Derived from fossil fuel petrochemical industry Produces greenhouse gas emissions during manufacturing and as it degrades Increases landfill at end of life Produces micro-plastic…

Media Claim Crop Reductions As Harvests Set New Records

The media this week are breathlessly promoting a paper by researchers at Curtin University in Australia that says climate change is harming food production. In reality, crop data show food production is rising dramatically in recent decades under ideal crop…

Past Global Changes Horizons – a new paleoscience magazine for teenagers and young adults

(Past Global Changes IPO) Past Global Changes Horizons highlights science of the past, written in an easy to understand, visual format, for those interested in, and wanting to learn more about, environmental issues and global climate change. The objective is to make readers aware that looking to the past, through the science of the past, can help us better understand the current environmental crisis, and what can be done to help Earth’s future.

‘The Science’ Isn’t Settled, Only The Spin. Here’s Why

What is it about “climate change” that makes it so different from everything else? It divides families, friendships, and political parties, it has brought media and campus self-censorship and classroom propaganda. Minds close over, spooked. To question any aspect is…

Ocean eddies strongly affect global mean sea-level projections – Science Advances

INTRODUCTION Satellite-observed sea-level measurements indicate an ongoing increase in the global mean sea level since the satellite era (1–3). Global mean sea-level rise (GMSLR) threatens low-lying coastal regions, and these regions will benefit strongly from sea-level projections to adapt their…

Lemurs and giant tortoises among species at risk if global warming reaches 3°C – EURACTIV

Unique island species including lemurs and the Galapagos giant tortoise could be at high risk of extinction if the planet warms by more than 3°C above pre-industrial levels, new research warns. EURACTIV’s media partner, The Guardian, reports. Analysis of 270…

New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in March

(Geological Society of America) The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. For March, GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; the ups and downs of the Missouri River; the Los Rastros Formation, Argentina; the Olympic Mountains of Washington State; methane seep deposits; meandering rivers; and the northwest Hawaiian Ridge. You can find these articles at https://bulletin.geoscienceworld.org/content/early/recent.