Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

University of Washington

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Element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response, study reveals

A new study shows that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of naturally circulating iodide in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions.

Element in blood is part of human — and hibernating squirrel — stress response, study reveals

A new study shows that part of the stress response in people and animals involves increasing the levels of naturally circulating iodide in blood. The discovery demonstrates a biological mechanism that rapidly responds to severe physiologic stress and potentially serves to protect us from further damage due to life-threatening conditions.

Searching for habitable exoplanets? Look for phosphorus

Scientists develop a new way to search for potentially habitable exoplanets by measuring the amount of phosphorus in their stars. Such planets should also have abundant phosphorus – necessary for life on Earth – increasing the chances for life.

Greenland is on track to lose ice faster than in any century over 12,000 years

If human societies don’t sharply curb emissions of greenhouse gases, Greenland’s rate of ice loss this century is likely to greatly outpace that of any century over the past 12,000 years, a new study concludes. Scientists say the results reiterate the need for countries around the world to take action now to reduce emissions, slow the decline of ice sheets, and mitigate sea level rise.

Some polar bears in far north are getting short-term benefit from thinning ice

The small subpopulation of polar bears in Kane Basin were doing better, on average, in recent years than in the 1990s. The bears are experiencing short-term benefits from thinning and shrinking multiyear sea ice that allows more sunlight to reach the ocean surface, which makes the system more ecologically productive.

‘A crazy year up north’: Arctic sea ice shrinks to 2nd-lowest level on record – USA TODAY

Sea ice is frozen ocean water that melts each summer, then refreezes each winter. “The year 2020 will stand as an exclamation point on the downward trend in Arctic sea ice extent.” Shrinking sea ice is just one of many…

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Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change

New research shows that a wide variety of marine animals — from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks — already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may not be in the future.

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Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change

New research shows that a wide variety of marine animals — from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks — already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may not be in the future.