Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

University of Washington

New study links cadmium to more severe flu, pneumonia infections

High levels of cadmium, a chemical found in cigarettes and in contaminated vegetables, are associated with higher death rates in patients with influenza or pneumonia — and may increase the severity of COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, according to a new study.

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Automobile Tires Are Killing West Coast Salmon, Not Climate Change

From the “where the rubber meets the road” department comes this bombshell finding that flies in the face of claims about the universal boogeyman of “climate change” killing salmon due to it supposedly raising water temperatures in streams where they…

Uncategorized

Automobile Tires Are Killing West Coast Salmon, Not Climate Change

From the “where the rubber meets the road” department comes this bombshell finding that flies in the face of claims about the universal boogeyman of “climate change” killing salmon due to it supposedly raising water temperatures in streams where they…

Uncategorized

Automobile Tires Are Killing West Coast Salmon, Not Climate Change

From the “where the rubber meets the road” department comes this bombshell finding that flies in the face of claims about the universal boogeyman of “climate change” killing salmon due to it supposedly raising water temperatures in streams where they…

NSF-funded deep ice core to be drilled at Hercules Dome, Antarctica

(University of Washington) Antarctica’s next deep ice core, drilling down to ice from 130,000 years ago, will be carried out by a multi-institutional U.S. team at Hercules Dome, a location hundreds of miles from today’s coastline and a promising site to provide key evidence about the possible last collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.

How bean plants fend off famished foes

Scientists have discovered that cowpeas — a type of bean plant — harbor receptors on the surface of their cells that can detect a compound in caterpillar saliva and initiate anti-herbivore defenses.

Black bear gut biome surprisingly simple

In recent decades, researchers have found that most mammals’ guts are surprisingly complex environments – home to a variety of microbial ecosystems that can profoundly affect an animal’s well-being. Scientists have now learned that the bear appears to be an exception, with its gut playing host to a microbial population that varies little across the intestinal tract.