Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Trees

Hurricanes drive the evolution of more aggressive spiders

Researchers who rush in after storms to study the behavior of spiders have found that extreme weather events such as tropical cyclones may have an evolutionary impact on populations living in storm-prone regions, where aggressive spiders have the best odds of survival.

Amazon rainforest absorbing less carbon than expected

(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) An international team of scientists, including climate scientists from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, found that accounting for phosphorus-deficient soils reduced projected carbon dioxide uptake by an average of 50% in the Amazon, compared to current estimates based on previous climate models that did not take into account phosphorus deficiency.

​How biomass helps farmers make the most of 'waste wood'

Trees are an important part of any farm. They reduce erosion and flooding, absorb air pollutants, provide habitat for insect-eating birds, and cast shade to help livestock stay cool. They produce crops, too, whether it’s fruit and nuts at an…

Why Coal Ain’t Cool: 7 Disadvantages of Coal You Need to Know

The post Why Coal Ain’t Cool: 7 Disadvantages of Coal You Need to Know appeared first on Earthava.

Coal is a “fossil fuel” that we use as a major power source. Globally, we use over 8.7 million tons of coal per year, and that number is only growing. It’s evident that it’s an extremely vital part of the economy all around the world. However, with all good things come the bad. In this article, you’ll […]

The post Why Coal Ain’t Cool: 7 Disadvantages of Coal You Need to Know appeared first on Earthava.

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A playful home built of recycled materials takes in sunrise views in Ecuador

Built largely from recycled materials, the home that architect Daniel Moreno Flores recently completed for an artistically inclined client in Ecuador oozes playfulness and creativity as well as a reduced environmental footprint.

Burning invasive western juniper maintains sagebrush dominance longer

(US Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service) Burning invasive western juniper increases the time — post-fire — that native mountain sagebrush will remain the dominant woody vegetation in the plant community by at least 44% compared to cutting juniper back, according to a new study in Ecology and Evolution by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their collaborators.

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #33

Latest Posts Archives Climate Hustle Posted on 17 August 2019 by John Hartz A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Aug 11 through Sat, Aug 17, 2019 Editor’s…