Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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What is a solar tower and how does it work?

A solar tower, also known as a solar power tower, is a way to concentrate solar power to make it a more powerful energy source. Solar towers are sometimes also called heliostat power plants because they use a collection of…

Democrats’ Energy Policies Hurt Black Americans The Most

Both Democrat presidential candidates, Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, have bowed to the demands of progressive activists by adopting extreme green energy policies that hurt black American voters. As a result, leaders of normally progressive/liberal civil rights organizations are…

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Scientists identify microbe that could help degrade polyurethane-based plastics

One of the most widely used oil-based plastics, polyurethane, is particularly hard to recycle or destroy safely. It also releases toxic chemicals into landfills. However, some microorganisms are capable of metabolizing these compounds and degrading the plastic waste in the process. Scientists have identified one such bacterium that could be used to help break down polyurethane-based plastics for future bio-recycling.

COVID-19: A Glimpse Of The Eco-Dystopia That Greens Keep Pushing

Greens just can’t help themselves. As the rest of us do what we can to tackle or withstand the COVID-19 crisis, they treat it as a sign, a warning from nature, a telling-off to hubristic, destructive mankind. The speed with…

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Scientists program cells to carry out gene-guided construction projects

Researchers developed a technique called genetically targeted chemical assembly, or GTCA, which they used to assemble electronically active biopolymer meshes on mammalian brain cells and on neurons in C. elegans. The polymers changed the firing rates of neurons in mammalian cells and altered C. elegans crawling behavior. GTCA was also tested on kidney cells and should work with other cell types.

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Observing phytoplankton via satellite

Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and the ramifications for the fishing industry.

Observing phytoplankton via satellite

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and the ramifications for the fishing industry.

Common anti-parasite treatments used on cattle have devastating impacts on wildlife

(University of Sussex) Experts have stressed an urgent need to find alternatives to wormers and anti-ectoparasitic products used widely on cattle, following the findings of a study just published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

If you’re poor, poverty is an environmental issue

(Cornell University) A survey from Cornell researchers — conducted among more than 1,100 US residents — found that there were, in fact, demographic differences in how people viewed environmental issues, with racial and ethnic minorities and lower-income people more likely to consider human factors such as racism and poverty as environmental, in addition to more ecological issues like toxic fumes from factories or car exhaust.

Treated wastewater may safe for aquaculture — Ben-Gurion University researchers

(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) A new study in aquaculture by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has determined that organic micropollutants (OMPs) in the water – trace elements of heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and personal care products as well as pesticides, solvents, and detergents – result in minimal accumulation in fish. Additionally, the wastewater does not appear to affect other commercially important traits of fish.