Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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50% of Volkswagen up! Buyers Now Buy e-up! in Germany

Volkswagen e-UPThe Volkswagen e-up! is one of the cheapest electric vehicles on the market. Throw in the usual operational savings of an electric car and you end up with a compelling total cost of ownership. Consumers are starting to catch on. Volkswagen reports that approximately 50% of up! sales in Germany are now e-up! sales

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Most of Earth’s carbon was hidden in the core during its formative years

Carbon is essential for life as we know it and plays a vital role in many of our planet’s geologic processes — not to mention the impact that carbon released by human activity has on the planet’s atmosphere and oceans. Despite this, the total amount of carbon on Earth remains a mystery, because much of it remains inaccessible in the planet’s depths.

Plant protection: Communication instead of poison

(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) Increasing drought and heat seriously affect plants. In the Upper Rhine area, for example, climate change results in the development of new plant diseases, an example being Esca, a disease that causes vines to die. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and partners have now launched the DialogProTec project that focuses on new approaches to plant protection without herbicides and fungicides. In collaboration with colleagues from Germany, France, and Switzerland, the researchers are conducting research in dialog with winegrowers, farmers, and industry.

Most of Earth’s carbon was hidden in the core during its formative years

(Smithsonian) A team of scientists reports March 30 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences how carbon behaved during Earth’s violent formative period. The findings can help scientists understand how much carbon likely exists in the planet’s core and the ways it influences chemical and dynamic activities that shape the world, including the convective motion that powers the magnetic field that protects Earth from cosmic radiation.

Uncertain climate future could disrupt energy systems

(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) An international team of scientists has published a new study proposing an optimization methodology for designing climate-resilient energy systems and to help ensure that communities will be able to meet future energy needs given weather and climate variability. Their findings were recently published in Nature Energy.

The candy-cola soda geyser experiment, at different altitudes

(American Chemical Society) Dropping Mentos® candies into a bottle of soda causes a foamy jet to erupt. Although science fair exhibitors can tell you that this geyser results from rapid degassing of the beverage induced by the candies, the precise means by which bubbles form hasn’t been well characterized. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Chemical Education used experiments in the lab and at various altitudes to probe the mechanism of bubble nucleation.

Using fiber optics to advance safe and renewable energy

(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Fiber optic cables, it turns out, can be incredibly useful scientific sensors. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have studied them for use in carbon sequestration, groundwater mapping, earthquake detection, and monitoring of Arctic permafrost thaw. Now they have been awarded new grants to develop fiber optics for two novel uses: monitoring offshore wind operations and underground natural gas storage.

Sorry, but the Virus Shows Why There Won’t Be Global Action on Climate Change – Foreign Policy

School students gather to demand action on climate change in Sydney, Australia, on Sept. 20, 2019. Jenny Evans/Getty Images The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted daily life, caused widespread sickness and fatalities, and sent the global economy careening toward a depression….