Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Texas

Climate Hustle 2: Premiering Today At 8 P.M.

Weekly, daily, even hourly, we are told that global temperatures are rising, ice caps are melting, and hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, floods, and droughts are all getting more frequent, intense, and destructive because of climate change. Not just climate change, of…

New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses

Scientists have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. Furthermore, they have shown that these synthetic brain cells can be joined together to form intricate networks that can then solve problems in a brain-like manner.

Something old, something new combine for effective vaccine against parasitic skin disease

(Ohio State University) Scientists are planning for Phase 1 human trials of a vaccine they developed by using CRISPR gene-editing technology to mutate the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, a skin disease common in tropical regions of the world and gaining ground in the United States.

Jaws of death: USU Eastern paleontologist renames giant, prehistoric marine lizard

(Utah State University) Utah State University Eastern paleontologist Joshua Lively describes a new genus of mosasaur, Gnathomortis stadtmani, a marine lizard that roamed the oceans of North America toward the end of the Age of Dinosaurs.

NASA tracking Beta’s heavy rainfall into lower Mississippi Valley

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) Slow-moving post-tropical storm Beta continues to drop large amounts of rainfall in Texas as it moves into the Lower Mississippi Valley on Sept. 23. A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations estimated Beta’s rainfall rates.

Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?

Scientists discovered in 1996 that sunquakes are linked to solar flares. Now, using helioseismic holography, scientists have analyzed a 2011 flare and shown that the impulsive source that generated the sunquake, and the refracted acoustic waves that later rippled the solar surface, was submerged 1,000 kilometers below the photosphere and flare. Further sunquake study could reveal if submerged sources are common and whether they can predict the appearance of flares and potential impact on Earth.

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Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?

Scientists discovered in 1996 that sunquakes are linked to solar flares. Now, using helioseismic holography, scientists have analyzed a 2011 flare and shown that the impulsive source that generated the sunquake, and the refracted acoustic waves that later rippled the solar surface, was submerged 1,000 kilometers below the photosphere and flare. Further sunquake study could reveal if submerged sources are common and whether they can predict the appearance of flares and potential impact on Earth.

U.S. Forest Fires Aren’t At Historic Highs—Not Even Close

California’s wildfires are a serious matter, but the official record of the United States shows forest fires in the US today are far below the annual average in the 1930s and 1940s. California wildfires have been in the news in…