Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Sustainable

Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years

(Terry Collins Assoc) The UN’s 3rd Global eWaste Monitor reports 53.6 million metric tonnes (Mt) of e-waste was produced last year — substantially more than the weight of all adults in Europe. Global e-waste has risen 21% by weight in just five years, fueled by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few repair options. In 2030 the world is projected to produce about 50% more e-waste per capita compared with 2014.

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Alarming long-term effects of insecticides weaken ant colonies

Scientists have shown how even low doses of neonicotinoid insecticides, as they may realistically occur in contaminated soils, adversely affect the development of black garden ants (Lasius niger). This study highlights the need to overthink current deployment and management of chemical pest control for more sustainable agriculture.

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To listen is to survive: Unravelling how plants process information

Researchers mapped the signaling network in plants and discovered novel insights about how plants process information about their environment. This gives new potential to strategies to protect crops and help them thrive in the time of increasing droughts.

WARNING: Al Gore’s Business Advice In The Post-Pandemic World

Al Gore, in a Wall Street Journal op-ed with David Blood, provides frightening advice to investors and corporate leaders on how they should act in the post-COVID-19 world. Here are key excerpts from the piece: As economies reopen around the…

Study finds that plastic recycling from europe being dumped in Asian waters

(National University of Ireland Galway) New research from NUI Galway and the University of Limerick has for the first time quantified the volume of plastic from European countries (EU, UK, Switzerland and Norway) that contributes to ocean littering from exported recycling.

Geologists identify deep-earth structures that may signal hidden metal lodes

(Earth Institute at Columbia University) In a new study, scientists have discovered previously unrecognized structural lines 100 miles or more down in the earth that appear to signal the locations of giant deposits of copper, lead, zinc and other vital metals lying close enough to the surface to be mined, but too far down to be found using current exploration methods.

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Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. The researchers warn that the impacts of mining on tropical forests are long-lasting and that active land management and restoration will be necessary to recover tropical forests on previously mined lands.