Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Surveys

9 quirky facts about the platypus

It’s possible to run out of adjectives when it comes to describing the platypus. This unique creature, endemic to Australia, has confounded scientists since its discovery. We still don’t know a great deal about the semi-aquatic animal, or the secrets…

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Marine heat wave linked with spike in whale entanglements

Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves — warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems — and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the US West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that became entangled in fishing gear.

Study connects marine heat wave with spike in whale entanglements

(University of California – Santa Cruz) Climate change is increasing the frequency and severity of marine heat waves — warm water anomalies that disrupt marine ecosystems — and this is creating new challenges for fisheries management and ocean conservation. A new study shows how the record-breaking marine heat wave of 2014 to 2016 caused changes along the US West Coast that led to an unprecedented spike in the numbers of whales that became entangled in fishing gear.

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Tension between foreign climbers and Sherpas began over 200 years ago

Recent tragedies on Everest have exposed growing resentment felt by some Sherpas towards foreign climbers and the foreign companies profiting from the mountain. One source of dispute has been Sherpa concern that some climbers are not fit enough to cope with the altitude.

What does 'Medicare for All' actually look like?

Born in the States but living in Canada, I’ve always been amused by some of the silly things said by those who reject “Medicare For All” in the U.S., describing health care in Canada as being all about long waits,…

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Fish switch: Identity of mystery invader in Florida waters corrected after 20 years

Sometimes scientists make mistakes. Case in point is the chanchita, a South American freshwater fish that has been swimming in Florida’s waters for at least two decades, all the while identified by experts as another invader, the black acara.

Jaguars could prevent a not-so-great American biotic exchange

(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) In eastern Panama, canid species from North and South America are occurring together for the first time. Urban and agricultural development and deforestation along the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor might be generating a new passageway for these invasive species adapted to human disturbance.

eDNA expands species surveys to capture a more complete picture

(NOAA Fisheries West Coast Region) Tiny bits of DNA collected from waters off the West Coast allowed scientists to identify more species of marine vertebrates than traditional surveys with trawl nets. They also reflect environmental shifts such as unusual ocean temperatures that affect the organisms present, new research shows.