Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Students

Uncategorized

How maths modelling helps efforts to eradicate banana bunchy top virus

Modelling the predicted movements of pervasive sap-sucking tiny insects before they infest banana crops has the potential to become a key tactic in the fight against a devastating virus, according to new research. Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is an aphid-transmitted banana disease that has been in Australia since 1913. Researchers have designed a model that tracked the probability of a banana plant being infected by aphids that carried the disease.

New Zealand’s Southern Alps glacier melt has doubled

(University of Leeds) Glaciers in the Southern Alps of New Zealand have lost more ice mass since pre-industrial times than remains today, according to a new study led by the University of Leeds. The study mapped Southern Alps ice loss from the end of the Little Ice Age — roughly 400 years ago — to 2019. It found that relative to recent decades, the Southern Alps lost up to 77% of their total Little Ice Age glacier volume.

D. Stamps receives NSF CAREER grant to study role of volcanism in continental rifting

(Virginia Tech) D. Sarah Stamps, an assistant professor in the Department of Geosciences in the College of Science, has received a five-year Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program grant worth $625,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to investigate the role of volcanism in early phase continental rifting — the process in which two plates move apart and stretch the continental crust — at the Natron Rift in Tanzania.

The Warming Meadows experiment and its implications for global warming – Aspen Times

William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo William J Farrell/Courtesy Photo…

Why the ‘wimpy’ Y chromosome hasn’t evolved out of existence

(Cell Press) The Y chromosome has shrunken drastically over 200 million years of evolution. Even those who study it have used the word “wimpy” to describe it, and yet it continues to stick around. An Opinion paper publishing on August 6, 2020 in the journal Trends in Genetics outlines a new theory–called the ‘persistent Y hypothesis’–to explain why the Y chromosome may be more resilient than it first appears.

Researchers: What’s in oilfield wastewater matters for injection-induced earthquakes

(Virginia Tech) Specifically, he pointed out that oilfield brine has much different properties, like density and viscosity, than pure water, and these differences affect the processes that cause fluid pressure to trigger earthquakes.

Does Climate Change Optimism Make You Pro-Trump?

My views on climate change—and, more generally, on humanity’s future—have never been stable. Depending on what I’m reading, and perhaps shifts in my neural weather, I ricochet between optimism and dread. Last spring I was feeling pretty glum about, well, everything when iconoclastic…