Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Egg and sperm cell size evolved from competition

(Northwestern University) Using mathematical modeling, researchers considered a time very early in evolution when primordial species reproduced using external fertilization. In the model, bigger reproductive cells, or gametes, presented a competitive edge because they could hold more nutrients for a potential zygote. Smaller gametes, however, required fewer resources to make, which put less stress on the parent. Organisms evolved to specialize in large or small gametes, precursors to eggs and sperm.

A new guide for communicating plant science

(Iowa State University) A new publication offers a comprehensive guide to help plant scientists communicate their work to the world. An Iowa State University scientist who contributed to the multi-institutional effort says it’s critical that plant scientists emphasize outreach to make sure plant science is able to meet the demands of climate change and population growth.

Environmental protection could benefit from ‘micro’ as well as ‘macro’ thinking

(University of Southampton) Scientists at the University of Southampton have conducted a study that highlights the importance of studying a full range of organisms when measuring the impact of environmental change – from tiny bacteria, to mighty whales.

Ocean temperature reconstructed over the last 700,000 years

(University of Bern) Researchers from the Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research at the University of Bern, Switzerland, reconstructed for the first mean ocean temperatures over the last 700,000 years using ice core data. The new knowledge serves to improve our understanding of the climate system.

Past Global Changes Horizons – a new paleoscience magazine for teenagers and young adults

(Past Global Changes IPO) Past Global Changes Horizons highlights science of the past, written in an easy to understand, visual format, for those interested in, and wanting to learn more about, environmental issues and global climate change. The objective is to make readers aware that looking to the past, through the science of the past, can help us better understand the current environmental crisis, and what can be done to help Earth’s future.

‘Sink into your grief.’ How one scientist confronts the emotional toll of climate change – Science Magazine

Sustainability scientist Kimberly Nicholas says confronting climate change requires acknowledging values and feelings as well as advancing science and policy. Janet Nichols By David MalakoffApr. 12, 2021 , 1:55 PM “I was trained to be calm, rational, and objective, to…

UNH researchers develop software to monitor ocean soundscape especially during COVID-19

(University of New Hampshire) An international development team, led by researchers at the University of New Hampshire, has created a user-friendly software program that can process sound data collected from the world’s oceans in a more standardized format that will enhance research and collaboration and help understand the global sea soundscape dynamics, including the impact of COVID-19 when travel and economic slowdowns put a halt to human activities in the ocean.

How did 500 species of a fish form in a lake? Dramatically different body clocks

(Florida Atlantic University) Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi’s cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity.

WHOI and NOAA release report on U.S. socio-economic effects of harmful algal blooms

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur in all 50 U.S. states and many produce toxins that cause illness or death in humans and commercially important species. However, attempts to place a more exact dollar value on the full range of these impacts often vary widely in their methods and level of detail, which hinders understanding of the scale of their socio-economic effects.