Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Coastal permafrost more susceptible to climate change than previously thought

(University of Texas at Austin) Research led by Micaela Pedrazas, who earned her masters at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences working with Professor Bayani Cardenas, has found permafrost to be mostly absent throughout the shallow seafloor along a coastal field site in northeastern Alaska. That means carbon can be released from coastline sources much more easily than previously thought.

Finally, a way to see molecules ‘wobble’

Researchers have found a way to visualize those molecules in even greater detail, showing their position and orientation in 3D, and even how they wobble and oscillate. This could shed invaluable insights into the biological processes involved, for example, when a cell and the proteins that regulate its functions react to a COVID-19 virus.

Bat-winged dinosaurs that could glide

(McGill University) Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, according to a new study led by an international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson. Unable to compete with other tree-dwelling dinosaurs and early birds, they went extinct after just a few million years. The findings, published in iScience, support that dinosaurs evolved flight in several different ways before modern birds evolved.

Researchers provide most detailed and complete record yet of Earth’s last magnetic reversal

(Research Organization of Information and Systems) Earth’s magnetic fields typically switch every 200 to 300 millennia. Yet, the planet has remained steady for more than twice that now, with the last magnetic reversal occurring about 773,000 years ago. A team of researchers based in Japan now has a better understanding of the geophysical events leading up to the switch and how Earth has responded since then.

New national poll: Young Americans favor reforms

(University of Massachusetts Lowell) The time has come for reform on how the United States deals with the electoral process, the environment and social justice, according to a new national poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion that takes an in-depth look at the views of Americans age 18 to 39.

14-Year-Old Girl Wins $25k For a Scientific Breakthrough That Could Lead to COVID-19 Cure

With the impact of the pandemic continuing to spread far and wide, people around the world are waiting for news on a possible treatment for the virus.  There’s good news on that front, as a 14-year-old girl from Texas has discovered a molecule that can selectively bind to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2.  Binding […]

The post 14-Year-Old Girl Wins $25k For a Scientific Breakthrough That Could Lead to COVID-19 Cure appeared first on Good News Network.

Targeting the shell of the Ebola virus

As the world grapples with COVID-19, the Ebola virus is again raging. Researchers are using supercomputers to simulate the inner workings of Ebola (as well as COVID-19), looking at how molecules move, atom by atom, to carry out their functions. Now, they have revealed structural features of the Ebola virus’s protein shell to provide therapeutic targets to destabilize the virus and knock it out with an antiviral treatment.

Researchers to track how coastal storms impact groundwater quality

(University of Massachusetts Lowell) UMass Lowell researchers are working to determine how severe coastal storms contribute to water pollution in an effort funded by a $784,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Final two journals in the 2020 pilot program use Subscribe to Open to publish volumes OA

(Annual Reviews) Nonprofit publisher Annual Reviews is pleased to announce that the 2020 volumes of the Annual Review of Environment and Resources and the Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science have been converted from gated to open access. All articles in these volumes are published under a CC BY license and the back volumes, dating from 1976 and 1952, respectively, are now freely available. These are the final two journals included in the 2020 pilot program for Subscribe to Open.

The GovLab launches collective intelligence to solve public problems

(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) A new report from The Governance Lab at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering examines global examples of how public institutions are using new technology to take advantage of the collective action and collective wisdom of people in their communities and around the world to address problems like climate change, loneliness and natural disaster response