Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Stage

Researchers provide most detailed and complete record yet of Earth’s last magnetic reversal

(Research Organization of Information and Systems) Earth’s magnetic fields typically switch every 200 to 300 millennia. Yet, the planet has remained steady for more than twice that now, with the last magnetic reversal occurring about 773,000 years ago. A team of researchers based in Japan now has a better understanding of the geophysical events leading up to the switch and how Earth has responded since then.

Pinpointing the ‘silent’ mutations that gave the coronavirus an evolutionary edge

Researchers have identified a number of ‘silent’ mutations in the roughly 30,000 letters of the COVID-19 virus’s genetic code that helped it thrive once it made the leap from bats and other wildlife to humans — and possibly helped set the stage for the global pandemic.

Uncategorized

Freezing cold war: militaries move in as Arctic ice retreats – photo essay

This month Arctic sea ice reached its second lowest extent on record, and modeling shows it will completely melt in summer by 2035. But where many see a disaster, some global powers discern an opportunity to secure geopolitical and commercial…

Why do identical cells act differently? Team unravels sources of cellular ‘noise’

Researchers have taken an important step toward explaining why genetically identical cells can produce varying amounts of the same protein associated with the same gene. Researchers demonstrated that most of the fluctuations in gene expression between identical cells occur in the first step of protein production, called transcription.

Digital Sprint powers rapid digital environmental solutions to tackle effects of Covid-19

(Cranfield University) A digital sprint, featuring a series of hackathons, led by Cranfield University and the Natural Environment Research Council has seen multiple projects awarded prizes for innovation and use of digital technology.

Scientists shed new light on mechanisms of malaria parasite motility

New insight on the molecular mechanisms that allow malaria parasites to move and spread disease within their hosts has just been published. The first X-ray structures of the molecular complex that allows malaria parasites to spread disease highlight a novel target for antimalarial treatments.

How deadly parasites ‘glide’ into human cells

A group of scientists provide insights into the molecular structure of proteins involved in the gliding movements through which the parasites causing malaria and toxoplasmosis invade human cells.