Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Soil

The world's largest privately owned giant sequoia forest may soon be protected

A conservation group has reached a $15.65 million deal to buy the largest privately owned giant sequoia grove left on Earth, an ancient forest with hundreds of the endangered redwood trees, which can live for 3,000 years and rise nearly…

The human imperative of stabilizing global climate change at 1.5°C – Science Magazine

The need to stabilize global climate Climate change will be the greatest threat to humanity and global ecosystems in the coming years, and there is a pressing need to understand and communicate the impacts of warming, across the perspectives of…

Why Russia is ambivalent about global warming – The Economist

FIRST CAME fires that turned the Siberian skies into a wall of solid smoke stretching for thousands of kilometres. Then came a drought that sucked the Lena river nearly dry, leaving boats marooned in the mud. It has been an…

6 weird things that happen after you die

Nature isn’t kind to the human body after death. Thankfully, the days of natural decomposition have been replaced by decidedly modern rituals of death. We can choose to delay the decomposition process by being embalmed, where our bodily fluids are…

21 reasons why forests are important

Forests cover nearly a third of all land on Earth, providing vital organic infrastructure for some of the planet’s densest, most diverse collections of life. They support countless species, including our own, yet we often seem oblivious of that. Humans…

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Reduce, reuse, recycle: The future of phosphorus

When Hennig Brandt discovered the element phosphorus in 1669, it was a mistake. He was really looking for gold. But his mistake was a very important scientific discovery. What Brandt couldn’t have realized was the importance of phosphorus to the future of farming.

Climate change expected to accelerate spread of sometimes-fatal fungal infection

(American Geophysical Union) Valley fever is endemic to hot and dry regions like the southwestern United States and California’s San Joaquin Valley, but a new study predicts climate change will cause the fungal infection’s range to more than double in size this century, reaching previously unaffected areas across the western U.S.

Why Russia is ambivalent about climate change – The Economist

The first in a series of articles on the impact of global warming on the world FIRST CAME fires that turned the Siberian skies into a wall of solid smoke stretching for thousands of kilometres. Then came a drought that…