Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

shells

How global warming might affect food security – The Hindu

Between the year 1870 (the first industrial revolution) and today, the global temperature has risen by almost 2 degrees Celsius. This has come about due to more fossil burning (oil, natural gas, coal), which has also increased the carbon dioxide…

World’s longest-running carbon dioxide measurement receives continuation funding

(Schmidt Ocean Institute) The Keeling Curve carbon dioxide measurement-the long-term atmospheric measurement that alerted the world to human-induced climate change- will receive $1 million in continuation funding from philanthropists Eric and Wendy Schmidt, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego announced today. In addition, the couple’s Schmidt Ocean Institute awarded a separate $450,000 grant to the university to support complementary ocean acidification measurements in the Atlantic and Pacific.

Australian valley a ‘natural laboratory’ to test carbon sequestration theory

(University of Sydney) An idea to enhance natural carbon capture from olivine weathering has never been tested at scale. University of Sydney geoscientists have proposed the Tweed Valley as a laboratory and gained some interesting initial results.

Sentinels of ocean acidification impacts survived Earth’s last mass extinction

Two groups of tiny, delicate marine organisms, sea butterflies and sea angels, were found to be surprisingly resilient — having survived dramatic global climate change and Earth’s most recent mass extinction event 66 million years ago.

Understanding the movement patterns of free-swimming marine snails

New research looks at the swimming and sinking kinematics of nine species of warm water pteropods (sea snails) to shed light on their ecology, predator-prey interactions, and vertical distributions. By using a high-speed stereophotogrammetry system, investigators were able to focus on how the shell shape, body geometry, and body size affect their swimming behavior from a fluid mechanics perspective, while image analysis and metabarcoding related swimming behaviors to night time and daytime vertical distributions.