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Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people’s eating habits

Archaeologists have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England. Until now, the story of the Conquest has primarily been told from evidence of the elite classes of the time. But little has been known about how it affected everyday people’s lives.

Simulations shows magnetic field can change 10 times faster than previously thought

(University of Leeds) A new study by the University of Leeds and University of California at San Diego reveals that changes in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field may take place 10 times faster than previously thought.

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Stop making sense: why it’s time to get emotional about climate change | Rebecca Huntley

It took me much longer than it should have to realise that educating people about climate change science was not enough. Due perhaps to my personality type (highly rational, don’t talk to me about horoscopes, please) and my background (the…

The battle to stop global warming is increasingly being fought in the courtroom – The Japan Times

LONDON/WASHINGTON/GENEVA – Climate change may be having its day in court. With the slow pace of international climate negotiations, lawyers from Switzerland to San Francisco are increasingly filing lawsuits demanding action. And they are getting creative — using new legal…

Global threats: How lessons from COVID-19 can prevent environmental meltdown

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) COVID-19, climate emergencies, and mass extinction all share striking similarities, especially with regard to their ‘lagged impacts.’ In each, early intervention can prevent further damage.

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Higher concentration of metal in Moon’s craters provides new insights to its origin

There has been considerable debate over how the Moon was formed. The popular hypothesis contends that the Moon was formed by a Mars-sized body colliding with Earth’s upper crust which is poor in metals. But new research suggests the Moon’s subsurface is more metal-rich than previously thought, providing new insights that could challenge our understanding of that process.

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Higher concentration of metal in Moon’s craters provides new insights to its origin

There has been considerable debate over how the Moon was formed. The popular hypothesis contends that the Moon was formed by a Mars-sized body colliding with Earth’s upper crust which is poor in metals. But new research suggests the Moon’s subsurface is more metal-rich than previously thought, providing new insights that could challenge our understanding of that process.