Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

San Diego

Understanding the love-hate relationship of halide perovskites with the sun

(Eindhoven University of Technology) Perovskiet solar cells are at the center of much recent solar research. The material is cheap and almost as efficient as silicon. However, perovskite cells have a love-hate-relationship with the sun. The light they need to generate electricity, also impairs the quality of the cells, limiting efficiency and stability over time. Research at the Eindhoven University of Technology and universities in China and the US now sheds new light on the causes of this degradation.

Simulations shows magnetic field can change 10 times faster than previously thought

(University of Leeds) A new study by the University of Leeds and University of California at San Diego reveals that changes in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field may take place 10 times faster than previously thought.

For the 1st time, a visible light explosion from a black hole merger

In recent years, black hole mergers in our universe have been detected via ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. Now, for the first time, astronomers believe they’ve observed visible light from a black hole merger, in a peculiar 3-black-hole system.

In the Arctic, spring snowmelt triggers fresh CO2 production

(San Diego State University) Studies have shown the Arctic is warming roughly twice as fast as the rest of the world, and its soil holds twice the amount of carbon dioxide as the atmosphere. New research from San Diego State University finds that water from spring snowmelt infiltrates the soil and triggers fresh carbon dioxide production at higher rates than previously assumed.

Has mystery of universe’s missing matter been solved?

Cosmologists have only been able to find half the matter that should exist in the universe. With the discovery of a new astronomical phenomenon and new telescopes, these researchers say they’ve just found the rest.

FSU researcher detects unknown submarine landslides in Gulf of Mexico

(Florida State University) A Florida State University researcher has used new detection methods to identify 85 previously unknown submarine landslides that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico between 2008 and 2015, leading to questions about the stability of oil rigs and other structures, such as pipelines built in the region.