Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru’s Amazon

(Duke University) The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru’s Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows. In some watersheds, there’s been a 670% increase in land area covered by abandoned mining pits that have filled in with water. Low-oxygen conditions in these ponds accelerate the conversion of submerged mercury, a leftover from the mining, into highly toxic methylmercury.

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The dazzling winners of the British Ecological Society’s photo awards

Images of the extraordinary, but endangered, Dalmatian pelican and weaver ants caring for their young are among those awarded in this year’s British Ecological Society’s “Capturing Ecology” photography competition

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Trump’s Legacy Will Live On In The Great American Outdoors Act

To the surprise of most Americans and the consternation of many in the “mainstream” media, Vice President Mike Pence highlighted the Trump Administration’s environmental record during the recent VP debate. Citing the president’s signing of the historic bill, Mr. Pence…

Airflow studies reveal strategies to reduce indoor transmission of COVID-19

Researchers present a range of studies investigating the aerodynamics of infectious disease. Their results suggest strategies for lowering risk based on a rigorous understanding of how infectious particles mix with air in confined spaces.

NSF says Arecibo telescope will be dismantled

Heartbreaking news. After 57 years as a world-class resource for astronomy, the iconic Arecibo telescope is to be decommissioned, or withdrawn from service, the NSF announced today. The dish-type radio telescope – built into a natural depression in the landscape in Puerto Rico – appears to be headed for a “controlled disassembly.”

More children and youth drowning as warming temperatures create unstable lake ice

As winters become milder and lake ice less stable, more children and young adults are falling through the ice and fatally drowning, say researchers. A new study, which looked at 4,000 drownings in 10 countries, including Canada, Russia, Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States, found warming winter air temperatures were a good predictor of the number of drownings.