Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

REsource

DNA from ancient packrat nests helps unpack Earth’s past

(American Museum of Natural History) New work shows how using next-generation DNA sequencing on ancient packrat middens–nests made out of plant material, fragments of insects, bones, fecal matter, and urine–could provide ecological snapshots of Earth’s past. Published today in the journal Ecology and Evolution, the study may pave the way for scientists to better understand how plant communities–and possibly animals, bacteria, and fungi as well–will respond to human-caused climate change.

Illuminating interactions between decision-making and the environment

(University of Pennsylvania) Employing a game theory model, University of Pennsylvania researchers demonstrate how strategic decisions influence the environment in which those decisions are made, alterations which in turn influence strategy. Their analysis, which identifies how incentives can tip a strategy from one extreme to another, applies to fields as diverse as fisheries dynamics to climate change policy.

Uncategorized

Unique reproductive trait for seagrass

New research reveals that species of the seagrass genus Posidonia have evolved a remarkable adaptation for ocean survival: a winged seed whose shape harnesses the force of underwater currents to hold it on the seafloor for rooting.

Satellite image data reveals rapid decline of China’s intertidal wetlands

(Frontiers) Researchers from the school of Geographical Sciences at Guangzhou University have revealed the stark decline of China’s intertidal wetlands by studying archives of satellite imaging data. The area of these wetlands reduced by 37.62% between the 1970s and 2015, placing these vulnerable yet valuable ecosystems and the species they support under increased pressure from anthropogenic development and future sea level rise.

Research reveals unique reproductive trait for seagrass

(Virginia Institute of Marine Science) New research by a team from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and University of Western Australia reveals that species of the seagrass genus Posidonia have evolved a remarkable adaptation for ocean survival: a winged seed whose shape harnesses the force of underwater currents to hold it on the seafloor for rooting.

Uncategorized

Scientists Warn Multiple Overlapping Crises Could Trigger ‘Global Systemic Collapse’ – ScienceAlert

Overlapping environmental crises could tip the planet into “global systemic collapse,” more than 200 top scientists warned Wednesday. Climate change, extreme weather events from hurricanes to heatwaves, the decline of life-sustaining ecosystems, food security and dwindling stores of fresh water –…

Scientists Warn Multiple Overlapping Crises Could Trigger ‘Global Systemic Collapse’ – ScienceAlert

Overlapping environmental crises could tip the planet into “global systemic collapse,” more than 200 top scientists warned Wednesday. Climate change, extreme weather events from hurricanes to heatwaves, the decline of life-sustaining ecosystems, food security and dwindling stores of fresh water –…