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Biodiversity loss in warming oceans | Stanford News – Stanford University News

A fossil study from Stanford University suggests the diversity of life in the world’s oceans declined time and again over the past 145 million years during periods of extreme warming. Many other factors are also expected to negatively impact habitat…

The legume family tree

(Penn State) The most comprehensive study of the family tree for legumes, the plant family that includes beans, soybeans, peanuts, and many other economically important crop plants, reveals a history of whole-genome duplications.

New research team launches to combat the effects of climate change on workers and communities

(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) The Center for Health, Work & Environment at the Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) and the Colorado Consortium on Climate Change and Human Health have launched the Climate, Work & Health Initiative (CWHI). CWHI is an interdisciplinary team of expert researchers, scientists, doctors, and public health professionals dedicated to combating the effects of climate change on vulnerable populations.

Penn State to lead critical minerals consortium powered by $1.2 million from DOE

(Penn State) A region famous for the coal that once fueled a growing nation is now the focus of a $1.2 million project, led by Penn State researchers, aimed at establishing domestic supplies of critical minerals needed to produce modern technology from cell phones to fighter jets.

New study deconstructs Dunbar’s number

(Stockholm University) An individual human can maintain stable social relationships with about 150 people, not more. This is the proposition known as ‘Dunbar’s number’ – that the architecture of the human brain sets an upper limit on our social lives. A new study from Stockholm University indicates that a cognitive limit on human group sizes cannot be derived in this manner.

New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in April

(Geological Society of America) The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. For April, GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; the Bell River hypothesis that proposes that an ancestral, transcontinental river occupied much of northern North America during the Cenozoic Era; new findings in the climatic history during one of Earth’s coldest periods: The Late Paleozoic Ice Age; and the age an nature of the Chicxulub impact crater.

A Fund Cleans Up by Betting on Clean Energy – Barron’s

Lucas White is portfolio manager for Resources and Climate Change Strategies at GMO in Boston. Photograph by Cody O’Loughlin For the four years of the Trump presidency, the White House was hostile to the concept of global warming, although independent…

Believed to Be Solitary, Male Sperm Whales Actually Hang With the Boys–in Friendships That Can Last Years

A Japanese biologist studying the social structure of sperm whales has discovered that the phrase “Saturday’s for the boys,” translates into echolocation. His research reveals that male sperm whales form strong platonic social bonds among other, normally solitary males—shedding light on the mammalian evolution of bromance. Famous for spending time hunting in the depths of […]

The post Believed to Be Solitary, Male Sperm Whales Actually Hang With the Boys–in Friendships That Can Last Years appeared first on Good News Network.

Warmer ocean temperatures may decrease Saharan dust crossing the Atlantic

Every year millions of tons of dust from the Sahara Desert are swirled up into the atmosphere and carried across the Atlantic. Research suggests that, as the climate changes, Saharan dust transport will decrease.

New Geology articles published online ahead of print in April

(Geological Society of America) Thirty-one new articles were published online ahead of print for Geology in April. Topics include shocked zircon from the Chicxulub impact crater; the Holocene Sonoran Desert; the architecture of the Congo Basin; the southern Death Valley fault; missing water from the Qiangtang Basin; sulfide inclusions in diamonds; how Himalayan collision stems from subduction; ghost-dune hollows; and the history of the Larsen C Ice Shelf. These Geology articles are online at https://geology.geoscienceworld.org/content/early/recent.