Menopausal Mother Nature

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E-scooters go on trial in Middlesbrough to aid UK’s green recovery

Residents of Middlesbrough in north-east England will be the first in the UK to legally ride electric scooters on the open road when the law changes on Saturday, as the government struggles to prevent a recovery from coronavirus based on…

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Dry tropical forests may be more at risk than wet rainforests, study says

Dry tropical forests are more vulnerable to the impacts of global heating than had been thought, according to new research, with wildlife and plants at severe risk of harm from human impacts. Some tropical forests are very wet, but others…

Are New Extreme Global Warming Projections Correct? – EcoWatch

By Jeff Berardelli For the past year, some of the most up-to-date computer models from the world’s top climate modeling groups have been “running hot” – projecting that global warming may be even more extreme than earlier thought. Data from…

Global e-waste surging: Up 21% in 5 years

(Terry Collins Assoc) The UN’s 3rd Global eWaste Monitor reports 53.6 million metric tonnes (Mt) of e-waste was produced last year — substantially more than the weight of all adults in Europe. Global e-waste has risen 21% by weight in just five years, fueled by higher consumption rates of electric and electronic equipment, short life cycles, and few repair options. In 2030 the world is projected to produce about 50% more e-waste per capita compared with 2014.

Global threats: How lessons from COVID-19 can prevent environmental meltdown

(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) COVID-19, climate emergencies, and mass extinction all share striking similarities, especially with regard to their ‘lagged impacts.’ In each, early intervention can prevent further damage.

Why are the offspring of older mothers less fit to live long and prosper?

(Marine Biological Laboratory) In a new study in rotifers (microscopic invertebrates), scientists tested the evolutionary fitness of older-mother offspring in several real and simulated environments, including laboratory culture, under threat of predation in the wild, or with reduced food supply. They confirmed that this effect of older maternal age, called maternal effect senescence, does reduce evolutionary fitness of the offspring in all environments, primarily through reduced fertility during their peak reproductive period. They also suggest an evolutionary mechanism for why this may occur.