Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Population

Blue whales change their tune before migrating

(Cell Press) While parsing through years of recorded blue whale songs looking for seasonal patterns, researchers were surprised to observe that during feeding season in the summer, whales sing mainly at night, but as they prepare to migrate to their breeding grounds for the winter, this pattern reverses and the whales sing during the day. This finding, published October 1 in the journal Current Biology, may explain known inconsistencies in whale song patterns.

Ice Age manatees may have called Texas home

(University of Texas at Austin) Manatees don’t live year-round in Texas, but these gentle sea cows are known to occasionally visit, swimming in for a ‘summer vacation’ and returning to warmer waters for the winter. New research has found fossil evidence for manatees along the Texas coast dating back to the most recent ice age. The discovery raises questions about whether manatees have been visiting for thousands of years, or if ice age manatees once called Texas home.

Coronavirus mutations: what we’ve learned so far

Geneticists around the world are studying 100,000 coronavirus genomes – sampled from Covid-19 patients in over 100 countries – to try to understand how the virus is mutating, What science has learned.

Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones

(Università di Bologna) Their scientific name is “Parazoanthus axinellae” and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea. A genetic analysis suggests they may belong to two different species and, therefore, there could be two types of cluster anemone. Researchers claim this may lead to more effective conservation strategies against the negative impact of climate change on this sea population

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Climate change threatens breeding birds

Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing — but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research. The study has uncovered drastic consequences for birds that are breeding earlier in lockstep with earlier starts of spring: chicks hatching earlier face increased risk of poor weather conditions, food shortages and mortality.

Climate change threatens breeding birds

Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing — but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research. The study has uncovered drastic consequences for birds that are breeding earlier in lockstep with earlier starts of spring: chicks hatching earlier face increased risk of poor weather conditions, food shortages and mortality.