Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Shift in diet allowed gray wolves to survive ice-age extinction

(Canadian Museum of Nature) Gray wolves are among the largest predators to have survived the extinction at the end of the last ice age. A new study analysing teeth and bones shows that the wolves may have survived by adapting their diet over thousands of years—from a primary reliance on horses during the Pleistocene, to caribou and moose today.

Petra Fromme honored with the prestigious Anfinsen Award

(Arizona State University) Arizona State University researcher Petra Fromme has received the 2021 Christian B. Anfinsen Award. The honor is bestowed by The Protein Society, the premier international association dedicated to supporting protein research.

Ocean eddies strongly affect global mean sea-level projections – Science Advances

INTRODUCTION Satellite-observed sea-level measurements indicate an ongoing increase in the global mean sea level since the satellite era (1–3). Global mean sea-level rise (GMSLR) threatens low-lying coastal regions, and these regions will benefit strongly from sea-level projections to adapt their…

Biden’s new 2030 climate change target: Will it be fair to other countries? – Vox.com

On April 22, President Biden will convene global leaders for a virtual climate summit in a bid to reassert US leadership and motivate countries to cut emissions much more aggressively. Of course, the US is only just recommitting to climate…

How did 500 species of a fish form in a lake? Dramatically different body clocks

(Florida Atlantic University) Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi’s cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity.

Why rescuing the climate and saving biodiversity go hand in hand – New Scientist

By Michael Le Page A kangaroo and her joey survey the aftermath of a wildfire in Mallacoota, Australia, in 2020 Jo-Anne McArthur/We Animals/naturepl THE Great Barrier Reef is already in a critical state. Rising sea temperatures are killing corals faster…

NASA Now Has Direct Evidence Humans Cause Global Warming – One Green Planet

While there are significant agreement and evidence showing humans’ role in climate change, scientific evidence wasn’t available. Now, NASA has calculated individual impacts on climate change and can definitively share humans’ role in it. While it’s common knowledge that the…

WHOI and NOAA release report on U.S. socio-economic effects of harmful algal blooms

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur in all 50 U.S. states and many produce toxins that cause illness or death in humans and commercially important species. However, attempts to place a more exact dollar value on the full range of these impacts often vary widely in their methods and level of detail, which hinders understanding of the scale of their socio-economic effects.

Great tits change their traditions for the better

(University of Konstanz) Researchers at the University of Konstanz and Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Germany have found that birds are able to change their culture to become more efficient. Published today as open access in the journal Current Biology, this research reveals immigration as a powerful driver of cultural change in animal groups that could help them to adapt to rapidly changing environments.