Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

plastic pollution

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Microplastic pollution harms lobster larvae, study finds

Microplastic fiber pollution in the ocean impacts larval lobsters at each stage of their development, according to new research. A study reports that the fibers affect the animals’ feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood.

Wet wipes and sanitary products found to be microplastic pollutants in Irish waters

(National University of Ireland Galway) Researchers from Earth and Ocean Sciences and the Ryan Institute at NUI Galway have carried out a study on the contribution of widely flushed personal care textile products (wet wipes and sanitary towels) to the ocean plastic crisis.

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The many lifetimes of plastics

Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They’re a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

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The many lifetimes of plastics

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) Many of us have seen informational posters at parks or aquariums specifying how long plastics bags, bottles, and other products last in the environment. They’re a good reminder to not litter, but where does the information on the lifetime expectancy of plastic goods come from, and how reliable is it?

Solve invasive seaweed problem by turning it into biofuels and fertilisers

(University of Bath) UK researchers have developed a cheap and simple way of creating biofuel and fertiliser from seaweed, whilst removing plastic from the oceans and cleaning up tourist beaches in the Caribbean and Central America.

A radar for plastic: High-resolution map of 1 kilometer grids to track plastic emissions in seas

(Tokyo University of Science) Plastic waste often ends up in river bodies and oceans, posing a serious threat to the marine ecosystem. To prevent the accumulation of plastic debris, we must find out where plastic emission is prevalent. To this end, scientists in Japan have come up with a new method to track plastic emissions from inland areas to sea. This method is useful to identify the ‘hotspots’ of plastic emission and can even help to implement appropriate measures to avoid plastic pollution.

‘Earth and Plastic’

(University of California – Santa Barbara) When future geologists want to identify in their digs and surveys the point at which the Anthropocene began, all they need do is locate the plastic.