Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Oregon

Archaeologists pinpoint population for the Greater Angkor region

(University of Oregon) Long-running archaeological research, boosted by airborne lidar sensing and machine-learning algorithms, finds that Cambodia’s Greater Angkor region was home to 700,000-900,000 people. The new estimate, made possible by a study designed at the University of Oregon, is the first for the entire 3,000-square-kilometer low-density region.

The Environmental Threat More Immediate Than Climate Change – GovExec.com

A Pew Research Center survey conducted last year found that 60% of U.S. adults surveyed viewed climate change as a major threat, and 65% claimed that the federal government was not doing enough to reduce the effects of climate change. …

New US weather data shows ‘obvious’ effects of climate change – Al Jazeera English

NOAA report on ‘new normals’ in climate over the past decade shows a hotter US, thanks to climate change. The United States is getting warmer and parts of it are getting wetter, according to weather data released on Tuesday by…

Articles for Geosphere posted online in April

(Geological Society of America) GSA’s dynamic online journal, Geosphere, posts articles online regularly. Locations and topics studied this month include the Central Anatolian Plateau; the Southern Rocky Mountain Volcanic Field; petrogenesis in the Grand Canyon; and the evolution of the Portland and Tualatin forearc basins, Oregon.

Socially just population policies can mitigate climate change and advance global equity

(Oregon State University) Socially just policies aimed at limiting the Earth’s human population hold tremendous potential for advancing equity while simultaneously helping to mitigate the effects of climate change, Oregon State University researchers say.

Learning From California’s Ambitious Climate Policy – Center For American Progress

Introduction and summary Subscribe to InProgress California has long been synonymous with effective climate policy. Beginning in 2001, the Golden State established its first voluntary emissions reporting program under Gov. Gray Davis (D). Subsequently, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) built on…

Climate change: Why some detractors say Earth is not in crisis – Deseret News

Utah author Bill Pekny wrote a book with 13 chapters describing climate change, full of charts, colorful graphics and “key takeaways” after each segment in which he impresses upon his readers why his research matters, and should offer comfort to…

UNH researchers develop software to monitor ocean soundscape especially during COVID-19

(University of New Hampshire) An international development team, led by researchers at the University of New Hampshire, has created a user-friendly software program that can process sound data collected from the world’s oceans in a more standardized format that will enhance research and collaboration and help understand the global sea soundscape dynamics, including the impact of COVID-19 when travel and economic slowdowns put a halt to human activities in the ocean.

Partial shade from solar panels increase abundance of flowers in late summer

(Oregon State University) A new study by Oregon State University researchers found that shade provided by solar panels increased the abundance of flowers under the panels and delayed the timing of their bloom, both findings that could aid the agricultural community.

New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in March

(Geological Society of America) The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. For March, GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; the ups and downs of the Missouri River; the Los Rastros Formation, Argentina; the Olympic Mountains of Washington State; methane seep deposits; meandering rivers; and the northwest Hawaiian Ridge. You can find these articles at https://bulletin.geoscienceworld.org/content/early/recent.