Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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How to stop global warming? The most controversial solutions explained – Eco-Business

Depending on who you ask, geoengineering is either a threat to serious climate action, a faraway back-up plan or a necessary part of today’s climate policy. All would likely agree it is contentious. Geoengineering encompasses a broad spectrum of proposed…

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Greenland’s ice melting faster than at any time in past 12,000 years

Greenland’s ice is starting to melt faster than at any time in the past 12,000 years, research has shown, which will raise sea levels and could have a marked impact on ocean currents. New measurements show the rate of melting…

Predator-prey interaction study reveals more food does not always mean more consumption

(NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center) Decades of data allow researchers at the NOAA Northeast Fisheries Science Center to look at predator-prey interactions in a different way: among multiple species throughout the water column. They have developed an unusually rich picture of who is eating whom off the Northeastern United States.

Mixing of the planet’s ocean waters is slowing down, speeding up global warming, study finds – Washington Post

The reduced up and down mixing is expected to have sweeping implications beyond just accelerating global warming. It is projected to increase energy available to hurricanes and other storms, reduce essential nutrients for fish in upper ocean layers and diminish…

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Lessons from a cooling climate

Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. While it’s true that plants take up large amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, the rocks themselves mediate a great deal of the carbon cycle over geological timescales. Processes like volcano eruptions, mountain building and erosion are responsible for moving carbon through Earth’s atmosphere, surface and mantle.

Lessons from a cooling climate

Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. While it’s true that plants take up large amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, the rocks themselves mediate a great deal of the carbon cycle over geological timescales. Processes like volcano eruptions, mountain building and erosion are responsible for moving carbon through Earth’s atmosphere, surface and mantle.

Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones

(Università di Bologna) Their scientific name is “Parazoanthus axinellae” and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea. A genetic analysis suggests they may belong to two different species and, therefore, there could be two types of cluster anemone. Researchers claim this may lead to more effective conservation strategies against the negative impact of climate change on this sea population