Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Neurology

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Does eating fish protect our brains from air pollution?

Older women who eat more than one to two servings a week of baked or broiled fish or shellfish may consume enough omega-3 fatty acids to counteract the effects of air pollution on the brain, according to a new study.

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Does eating fish protect our brains from air pollution?

Older women who eat more than one to two servings a week of baked or broiled fish or shellfish may consume enough omega-3 fatty acids to counteract the effects of air pollution on the brain, according to a new study.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory welcomes 6 new research fellows to Innovation Crossroads

(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Oak Ridge National Laboratory welcomed six technology innovators to join the fourth cohort of Innovation Crossroads, the Southeast’s only entrepreneurial research and development program based at a US Department of Energy national laboratory.

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Link between obesity and sleep loss

Can staying up late make you fat? Researchers found the opposite to be true when they studied sleep in worms: It’s not the sleep loss that leads to obesity, but rather that excess weight can cause poor sleep.

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Link between obesity and sleep loss

Can staying up late make you fat? Researchers found the opposite to be true when they studied sleep in worms: It’s not the sleep loss that leads to obesity, but rather that excess weight can cause poor sleep.

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How do mantis shrimp find their way home?

New research indicates mantis shrimp use path integration to find their way back to their burrows after leaving to seek food or mates. That means they can track their distance and direction from their starting point. A series of creative experiments revealed that to do that, they rely on a hierarchy of cues from the sun, polarized light patterns, and their internal senses.

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How do mantis shrimp find their way home?

New research indicates mantis shrimp use path integration to find their way back to their burrows after leaving to seek food or mates. That means they can track their distance and direction from their starting point. A series of creative experiments revealed that to do that, they rely on a hierarchy of cues from the sun, polarized light patterns, and their internal senses.

Uncategorized

How do mantis shrimp find their way home?

New research indicates mantis shrimp use path integration to find their way back to their burrows after leaving to seek food or mates. That means they can track their distance and direction from their starting point. A series of creative experiments revealed that to do that, they rely on a hierarchy of cues from the sun, polarized light patterns, and their internal senses.