Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Natural England

Invasive rushes spreading in upland farm fields

(Lancaster University) Scientists have used a series of Google Earth images to plot the spread of rushes in farm fields in the West Pennine Moor SSSI — an area of the Lancashire uplands between Bolton, Bury and Darwen. Using more than 200 images from Google Earth taken across a 13-year period between 2005 and 2018, the researchers found that rushes have spread across the surveyed area by between 82 per cent and 174 per cent.

After a 240-year hiatus, white-tailed eagles are coming back to southern England

For centuries, there’s been an eagle-shaped hole in the skies over England where the majestic white-tailed eagle once soared. The enormous raptor — its wingspan stretches nearly eight feet — was hunted to extinction some 240 years ago. “They are…

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‘The losses could be profound’: floods wreak havoc on wildlife

For 900 years, Lugg and Hampton wildflower meadows in Herefordshire have bloomed into a wash of colour in spring. These fertile meadows were highly prized, and the Norman lords who owned them used the hay crop to help fund Hereford’s…

Wilful blindness continues, completely unabated

Here is an annotated (in bold and italics) copy of the government response to the phenomenally popular petition by Chris Packham to ban driven grouse shooting (see here). Basically, Defra maintains its wilful blindness of the issues and their responsibility…

Tim Melling – Hen Harrier

Tim writes: according to the RSPB, 2019 was a record year for Hen Harriers in England with 33 young fledged from 9 nests. But it is within my memory that 30 pairs nested in Lancashire’s Forest of Bowland alone. Nine…

Guest blog – Grassland management (1) by Paul Sterry

Paul Sterry has an academic background in freshwater biology and is a passionate conservationist. He has been writing about natural history and photographing wildlife for the last 40 years, with an emphasis on the British scene. Looking back through the…

Poor old Duke

We are often told that Hen Harriers depend on grouse moors for their survival – this is a big lie rather than a small one. The fact is that Hen Harrier breeding success over a long period of time (in…