Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

National Science Foundation

New study reveals how ancient Puerto Ricans cooked

(University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science) A new study by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami (UM) College of Arts and Sciences, and Valencia College analyzed the fossilized remains of clams to reconstruct the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico. The results showed that Puerto Ricans over 2,500 years ago were partial to roasting rather than boiling their food as a soup.

Climate change and human activities threatens picky penguins

(University of Saskatchewan) Eating a krill-only diet has made one variety of Antarctic penguin especially susceptible to the impacts of climate change, according to new research involving the University of Saskatchewan (USask) which sheds new light on why some penguins are winners and others losers in their rapidly changing ecosystem.

Underwater telecom cables make superb seismic network

(University of California – Berkeley) Photonic systems can transform underwater fiber-optic cables into a dense network of seismic stations to illuminate ocean-floor earthquake zones impossible to study today, according to a new study by researchers from UC Berkeley, Berkeley Lab and Rice University. The scientists turned 20 kilometers of cable around the underwater San Gregorio Fault system in Monterey Bay into an array of some 10,000 seismic sensors by interferometrically measuring backscattered light caused by strain along the cable.

Adelphi, OHIO researchers determine dinosaur replaced teeth as fast as sharks

(Ohio University) A meat-eating dinosaur species that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, as reported in a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

Bad news for Nemo

(Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution) The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies ‘Finding Nemo’ and ‘Finding Dory’ don’t have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study.

El Nino swings more violently in the industrial age, compelling hard evidence says

(Georgia Institute of Technology) El Ninos, La Ninas, and the climate phenomenon that drives them have become more extreme in the times of human-induced climate change, says hard physical evidence spanning millennia that has recently come together.