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News about Climate Change and our Planet

National Science Foundation

New Scientific Scandal Shaking The Climate Alarmist Industry

As readers at this site are well aware, the field of climate “science” and alarmism is subject to an extraordinary degree of orthodoxy enforcement, where all information supporting the official narrative gets enthusiastically promoted, while all information disagreeing with the…

Biodiversity loss in warming oceans | Stanford News – Stanford University News

A fossil study from Stanford University suggests the diversity of life in the world’s oceans declined time and again over the past 145 million years during periods of extreme warming. Many other factors are also expected to negatively impact habitat…

Archaeologists pinpoint population for the Greater Angkor region

(University of Oregon) Long-running archaeological research, boosted by airborne lidar sensing and machine-learning algorithms, finds that Cambodia’s Greater Angkor region was home to 700,000-900,000 people. The new estimate, made possible by a study designed at the University of Oregon, is the first for the entire 3,000-square-kilometer low-density region.

Researchers develop new metal-free, recyclable polypeptide battery that degrades on demand

(Texas A&M University) The introduction of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries has revolutionized technology as a whole, leading to major advances in consumer goods across nearly all sectors. Battery-powered devices have become ubiquitous across the world. While the availability of technology is generally a good thing, the rapid growth has led directly to several key ethical and environmental issues surrounding the use of Li-ion batteries.

What can a dinosaur’s inner ear tell us? Just listen

(Yale University) New Haven, Conn. — If paleontologists had a wish list, it would almost certainly include insights into two particular phenomena: how dinosaurs interacted with each other and how they began to fly.

Flatfish got weird fast due to evolutionary cascade

(Rice University) Flatfishes rapidly evolved into the most asymmetric vertebrates by changing multiple traits at once, according to a new Rice University study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using cosmic-ray neutron bursts to understand gamma-ray bursts from lightning

(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Analysis of data from a lightning mapper and a small, hand-held radiation detector has unexpectedly shed light on what a gamma-ray burst from lightning might look like – by observing neutrons generated from soil by very large cosmic-ray showers.

Implications are global in new study predicting Human exodus in Bangladesh

(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Researchers led by Maurizio Porfiri at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, apply data science to predict how the cascading effects of the migration in Bangladesh will ultimately affect 1.3 million people across the country by 2050.

Climate-friendly microbes chomp dead plants without releasing heat-trapping methane

(University of Texas at Austin) Scientists have identified a new phylum of microbes found around the world that appear to be playing an important (and surprising) role in the global carbon cycle by helping break down decaying plants without producing the greenhouse gas methane. The phylum is named Brockarchaeota after Thomas Brock, a pioneer in the study of microbes that live in extreme environments who died on April 4.

Fact check: Scientific consensus says humans are dominant cause of climate change – USA TODAY

The claim: Human-caused climate change is a hoax President Joe Biden pledged during a virtual climate summit, held on Earth Day, to cut U.S. greenhouse gas pollution to help mitigate a global climate crisis. The goal is to have 2030…