Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Migration

5,200-year-old grains in the eastern Altai Mountains redate trans-Eurasian crop exchange

(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Cereals from the Fertile Crescent and broomcorn millet from northern China spread across the ancient world, integrating into complex farming systems that used crop-rotation cycles enabled by the different ecological regions of origin. The resulting productivity allowed for demographic expansions and imperial formation in Europe and Asia. In this study, an international, interdisciplinary team of scientists illustrate that people moved these crops across Eurasia earlier than previously realized, adapting cultivation methods for harsh agricultural environments.

New findings from the Neotropics suggest contraction of the ITCZ

(University of New Mexico) Research by an international team of scientists led by University of New Mexico Professor Yemane Asmerom suggests contraction of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during a warming Earth, leading in turn to drying of the Neotropics, including Central America, and aggravating current trends of social unrest and mass migration.

Fitness&Well-Being

What is synesthesia and what's it like to have it?

I know that the number four is yellow, but I have a friend who insists four is red. She also says four has a motherly personality, but my four has no personality — none of my numbers do. But all…

What is synesthesia and what's it like to have it?

I know that the number four is yellow, but I have a friend who insists four is red. She also says four has a motherly personality, but my four has no personality — none of my numbers do. But all…

Uncategorized

Color-changing amphibians: Lane change in the cytoskeleton

Many amphibians and fish are able to change their color in order to better adapt to their environment. Scientists have now investigated the molecular mechanisms in the cytoskeleton necessary for this and revealed potential evolutionary paths.

Study: One-third of plant and animal species could be gone in 50 years

(University of Arizona) University of Arizona researchers studied recent extinctions from climate change to estimate the loss of plant and animal species by 2070. Their results suggest that as many as one in three species could face extinction unless warming is reduced.

Climate change models predicted ocean currents would speed up — but not this soon – NBCNews.com

Ocean currents — undersea conveyor belts that help regulate Earth’s climate and influence weather systems around the world — have been speeding up over the past two decades as the planet warms, according to new research. The puzzling discovery, detailed…

Oral traditions and volcanic eruptions in Australia

(Geological Society of America) In Australia, the onset of human occupation (about 65,000 years?) and dispersion across the continent are the subjects of intense debate and are critical to understanding global human migration routes. A lack of ceramic artifacts and permanent structures has resulted in a scarcity of dateable archaeological sites older than about 10,000 years.

Using neutrons and X-rays to analyze the aging of lithium batteries

(Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie) An international team has used neutron and X-ray tomography to investigate the dynamic processes that lead to capacity degradation at the electrodes in lithium batteries. Using a new mathematical method, it was possible to virtually unwind electrodes that had been wound into the form of a compact cylinder, and thus actually observe the processes on the surfaces of the electrodes. The study was published in Nature Communications.