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Dry tropical forests may be more at risk than wet rainforests, study says

Dry tropical forests are more vulnerable to the impacts of global heating than had been thought, according to new research, with wildlife and plants at severe risk of harm from human impacts. Some tropical forests are very wet, but others…

Call for immunology to return to the wild

(Menzies Institute for Medical Research ) In an article published today in Science, a multidisciplinary research team from more than 10 universities and research institutes outlines how integrating a more diverse set of species and environments could enhance the biomedical research cycle.

Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted – EurekAlert

New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone. The study, published today in Nature Climate Change, attributes this difference to changes in…

Global warming will cause ecosystems to produce more methane than first predicted

(Queen Mary University of London) New research suggests that as the Earth warms natural ecosystems such as freshwaters will release more methane than expected from predictions based on temperature increases alone.

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Dangerous tick-borne bacterium extremely rare in New Jersey

There’s some good news in New Jersey about a potentially deadly tick-borne bacterium. Researchers examined more than 3,000 ticks in the Garden State and found only one carrying Rickettsia rickettsii, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever. But cases of tick-borne spotted fevers have increased east of the Mississippi River, and more research is needed to understand why.

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From Jekyll to Hyde: New study pinpoints mutation that makes E. coli deadlier

We all know that there are ”good” and ”bad” bacteria, but scientists have little insight into how bacteria become ”bad” or ”pathogenic” and cause disease. Now, a team of scientists has described how mutations resulting in the malformation of the lipopolysaccharide transporter — an essential protein for bacterial growth– caused a non-pathogenic Escherichia coli strain to become pathogenic.

Sunnier but riskier

(Penn State) Conservation efforts that open up the canopy of overgrown habitat for threatened timber rattlesnakes are beneficial to snakes but could come at a cost, according to a new study.