Please help keep this Site Going

Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

materials science

Harvard awards $1.3M to fund climate change solutions – Harvard Gazette

Harvard faculty and students are advancing solutions to climate change and its wide-ranging impacts through new scientific, technological, legal, behavioral, public health, policy, and artistic innovations. Ten research teams will share $1.3 million in the eighth round of the Climate…

Device Wraps Around Hot Surfaces to Turn Wasted Heat to Electricity

The energy systems that power our lives also produce wasted heat—like heat that radiates off hot water pipes in buildings and exhaust pipes on vehicles. A new flexible thermoelectric generator can wrap around pipes and other hot surfaces and convert wasted heat into electricity more efficiently than previously possible, according to scientists at Penn State […]

The post Device Wraps Around Hot Surfaces to Turn Wasted Heat to Electricity appeared first on Good News Network.

How an Oyster Can Form a Perfectly Symmetrical Pearl Better Than We Can With All Our Technology

In research that could inform future high-performance nanomaterials, a University of Michigan-led team has uncovered for the first time how mollusks build ultradurable structures with a level of symmetry that outstrips everything else in the natural world, with the exception of individual atoms. “We humans, with all our access to technology, can’t make something with […]

The post How an Oyster Can Form a Perfectly Symmetrical Pearl Better Than We Can With All Our Technology appeared first on Good News Network.

When Walked On, These Wooden Floors Harvest Enough Energy to Turn On a Lightbulb

Researchers from Switzerland are tapping into an unexpected energy source right under our feet: wooden floorings. Their nanogenerator enables wood to generate energy from our footfalls. They also improved the wood used in the their nanogenerator with a combination of a silicone coating and embedded nanocrystals, resulting in a device that was 80 times more […]

The post When Walked On, These Wooden Floors Harvest Enough Energy to Turn On a Lightbulb appeared first on Good News Network.

Tiny tweaks to sparkle: Editing light-emitting organic molecules via surface modification

(Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are an emerging class of polymers with a plethora of potential applications thanks to their crystallinity, stability, and porosity. In a recent study, researchers from the National University of Singapore and Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report a strategy to tune the emission properties of COFs by introducing atoms or small molecular groups as surface perturbations. Their findings provide a platform to further functionalize COFs for light-emitting and sensing applications.

Rethinking plastics

(University of Delaware) In a new issue of Science, devoted to the plastics problem, University of Delaware researchers LaShanda Korley and Thomas Epps, III, join collaborators in calling for new approaches to plastics design, production and use, with the goal of keeping plastics out of landfills and waterways, reusing the valuable resources they represent indefinitely in a “circular” plastics economy.

Stopping the sulfur shuttle for better batteries

(King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)) A layer of hierarchically three-dimensional porous graphene greatly suppresses a problem holding back the development of lithium-sulfur batteries.

Pushing the boundaries of colloidal quantum dots by making their sizes equal

(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) Perovskite colloidal quantum dots (Pe-CQDs) are highly promising nanocrystals for optoelectronic applications. However, the size of the crystals should ideally be equal to ensure a consistent energy landscape. In a recent study, scientists clarified the relationship between differences in particle size — polydispersity — and the optoelectronic characteristics of Pe-CQDs. They showed that using equally sized, or ‘monodisperse,’ quantum dots results in markedly better performance in Pe-CQD solar cells, paving the way for future optoelectronic devices.

Please help keep this Site Going