Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Researchers provide most detailed and complete record yet of Earth’s last magnetic reversal

(Research Organization of Information and Systems) Earth’s magnetic fields typically switch every 200 to 300 millennia. Yet, the planet has remained steady for more than twice that now, with the last magnetic reversal occurring about 773,000 years ago. A team of researchers based in Japan now has a better understanding of the geophysical events leading up to the switch and how Earth has responded since then.

Microbial diversity below seafloor is as rich as on Earth’s surface

For the first time, researchers have mapped the biological diversity of marine sediment, one of Earth’s largest global biomes. The research team discovered that microbial diversity in the dark, energy-limited world beneath the seafloor is as diverse as in Earth’s surface biomes.

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75 ways Trump made America dirtier and the planet warmer

“I want crystal clean water and air.” That’s what Donald Trump said in the first chaotic presidential debate with Joe Biden. But there is scant evidence of that desire in the actions of his administration, which has spent nearly four…

Uncategorized

75 ways Trump made America dirtier and the planet warmer

“I want crystal clean water and air.” That’s what Donald Trump said in the first chaotic presidential debate with Joe Biden. But there is scant evidence of that desire in the actions of his administration, which has spent nearly four…

Depths of the Weddell Sea are warming five times faster than elsewhere

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Over the past three decades, the depths of the Antarctic Weddell Sea have warmed five times faster than the rest of the ocean at depths exceeding 2,000 metres. This was the main finding of an article just published by oceanographers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI).

Researchers to track how coastal storms impact groundwater quality

(University of Massachusetts Lowell) UMass Lowell researchers are working to determine how severe coastal storms contribute to water pollution in an effort funded by a $784,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

Driver of the largest mass extinction in the history of the Earth identified

252 million years ago, at the transition from the Permian to the Triassic epoch, most of the life forms existing on Earth became extinct. Using latest analytical methods and detailed model calculations, scientists have now succeeded for the first time to provide a conclusive reconstruction of the geochemical processes that led to this unprecedented biotic crisis.