Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining

A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide if and how deep-sea mining should proceed.

Aquaculture’s role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era

(American University) A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.

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Tackling coral reefs’ thorny problem: Crown-of-thorns starfish

Researchers have revealed the evolutionary history of the crown-of-thorns starfish — a predator of coral that can devastate coral reefs. Their findings shed light on how the populations of these starfish have changed over time and could potentially help reduce their ecological destruction.

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Microplastic pollution harms lobster larvae, study finds

Microplastic fiber pollution in the ocean impacts larval lobsters at each stage of their development, according to new research. A study reports that the fibers affect the animals’ feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood.

How do waterspouts form?

Waterspouts are essentially tornadoes that form over water. They can and do form over all the world’s oceans. In the U.S., they’re most common near the Florida Keys and in the Gulf of Mexico.

New study sparks fresh call for seagrass preservation

(Edith Cowan University) An increase in carbon dioxide emissions equivalent to 5 million cars a year has been caused by the loss of seagrass meadows around the Australian coastline since the 1950s.PhD student Cristian Salinas from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Western Australia calculated that around 161,150 hectares of seagrass have been lost from Australian coasts since the 1950s. This has resulte in a 2 per cent increase in annual carbon dioxide emissions from land-use change.

Simulations shows magnetic field can change 10 times faster than previously thought

(University of Leeds) A new study by the University of Leeds and University of California at San Diego reveals that changes in the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field may take place 10 times faster than previously thought.

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MOSAiC floe: Sea ice formation

The New Siberian Islands were the birthplace of the MOSAiC floe: the sea ice in which the research vessel Polarstern is now drifting through the Arctic was formed off the coast of the archipelago, which separates the East Siberian Sea and the Laptev Sea to the north of Siberia, in December 2018.

The latest findings on the MOSAiC floe

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) The New Siberian Islands were the birthplace of the MOSAiC floe: the sea ice in which the research vessel Polarstern is now drifting through the Arctic was formed off the coast of the archipelago, which separates the East Siberian Sea and the Laptev Sea to the north of Siberia, in December 2018.