Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

management

Global warming. Inequality. COVID-19. And Al Gore is … Optimistic? – Grist

News on climate in the time of coronavirus Subscribe today This story was originally published by Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Before he was the guy with the climate change PowerPoint presentation, before…

Genetic differences between global American Crocodile populations identified in DNA analysis

(University of Bristol) A genetic analysis of the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) has re-established our understanding of its population structure, aiding its conservation. The collaborative study spanning seven countries and led by the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Bristol researchers is published in PLOS ONE.

Uncategorized

Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining

A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide if and how deep-sea mining should proceed.

Uncategorized

UCLA receives Department of Energy grant to transform CO2 into construction materials

(University of California – Los Angeles) A UCLA research team has received a two-year, $2 million grant from the US Department of Energy to support development of a process that can convert carbon dioxide emissions into construction materials. The technology they devised captures carbon dioxide from raw flue gas as it exits power plants, cement plants and other producers of carbon dioxide, reducing emissions to the atmosphere. The process also cuts down on the use of traditional cement.

UCLA receives Department of Energy grant to transform CO2 into construction materials

(University of California – Los Angeles) A UCLA research team has received a two-year, $2 million grant from the US Department of Energy to support development of a process that can convert carbon dioxide emissions into construction materials. The technology they devised captures carbon dioxide from raw flue gas as it exits power plants, cement plants and other producers of carbon dioxide, reducing emissions to the atmosphere. The process also cuts down on the use of traditional cement.

Global Warming. Inequality. COVID-19. And Al Gore Is…Optimistic? – Mother Jones

Omar Marques/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones’ newsletters. This piece was originally published in Wired and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. Before he was the guy with the climate change PowerPoint presentation, before…

Uncategorized

Global Warming. Inequality. Covid-19. And Al Gore Is … Optimistic? – WIRED

AR: You just said that was a huge opportunity for investing and a business opportunity. Do you not see a tension between so-called Environment, Social and Governance investing and the fiduciary responsibility that institutional investors and executives have to maximize…

Uncategorized

How to tackle climate change, food security and land degradation

How can some of world’s biggest problems — climate change, food security and land degradation — be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a new study.

Uncategorized

How to tackle climate change, food security and land degradation

How can some of world’s biggest problems — climate change, food security and land degradation — be tackled simultaneously? Some lesser-known options, such as integrated water management and increasing the organic content of soil, have fewer trade-offs than many well-known options, such as planting trees, according to a new study.

1.5 billion people will depend on water from mountains

(University of Zurich) Global water consumption has increased almost fourfold in the past 100 years, and many regions can only meet their water demand thanks to essential contributions from mountain regions. In 30 years, almost a quarter of the world’s lowland population will strongly depend on runoff from the mountains. Only sustainable development can ensure the important function of mountain areas as Earth’s “water towers”.