Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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How to see Comet NEOWISE

Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) is basically a binocular object, although some experienced observers with pristine skies are reporting they can see it with the eye alone. This post has information and charts that will help you see the comet.

Full moon, faint eclipse, on July 4-5

The penumbral lunar eclipse of July 4-5, 2020 will be so nearly imperceptible that some will see nothing even while staring at it. Then again … very observant people will notice something strange happening on the moon, without knowing an eclipse is taking place. Who will see it (or not) in this post.

For the 1st time, a visible light explosion from a black hole merger

In recent years, black hole mergers in our universe have been detected via ripples in spacetime known as gravitational waves. Now, for the first time, astronomers believe they’ve observed visible light from a black hole merger, in a peculiar 3-black-hole system.

Rising water temperatures could endanger the mating of many fish species

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) In a new meta-study, experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have published ground-breaking findings on the effects of climate change for fish stock around the globe.

Tabletop quantum experiment could detect gravitational waves

(University College London) Tiny diamond crystals could be used as an incredibly sensitive and small gravitational detector capable of measuring gravitational waves, suggests new UCL-led research.

Aboriginal artifacts reveal first ancient underwater cultural sites in Australia

(Flinders University) The first underwater Aboriginal archaeological sites have been discovered off northwest Australia dating back thousands of years ago when the current seabed was dry land.Aboriginal artefacts discovered off the Plibara coast in Western Australia were discovered through a series of archaeological and geophysical surveys in the Dampier Archipelago, as part of the Deep History of Sea Country Project, funded through the Australian Research Council’s Discovery Project Scheme.

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Buzzing to rebuild broken bone

Healing broken bones could get easier with a device that provides both a scaffold for the bone to grow on and electrical stimulation to urge it forward, engineers report. Although minor bone breaks usually heal on their own, large fractures with shattered or missing chunks of bone are more difficult to repair. A biocompatible, dissolving polymer device can mimic the body’s natural electrical field and help the cells regenerate.

When the sky exploded: Remembering Tunguska

On June 30, 1908, the largest asteroid impact in recorded history occurred in remote Siberia, Russia. We now celebrate Asteroid Day each year on the anniversary the Tunguska event, as it is now known.