Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Litter

There are microplastics near the top of Mount Everest too

Researchers analyzing snow and stream samples have found evidence of microplastic pollution on Mount Everest. While the highest concentrations of microplastics were around Base Camp where hikers and trekkers spend the most time, the team also found microplastics as high up as 8,440 meters above sea level, just below the summit.

Swedish, Finnish and Russian wolves closely related

(Uppsala University) The Scandinavian wolf originally came from Finland and Russia, and unlike many other European wolf populations its genetic constitution is virtually free from dog admixture. In addition, individuals have migrated into and out of Scandinavia. These findings have emerged from new research at Uppsala University in which genetic material from more than 200 wolves was analysed. The study is published in the journal Evolutionary Applications.

Cockroach mating habits and developmental features help uncover insect evolution

(University of Tsukuba) A research team led by the University of Tsukuba examined the mating habits of an often-overlooked cockroach family, Nocticolidae, to provide clues about insect evolution. Although the studied cockroaches displayed novel wing-flapping behavior prior to copulation, similarities in other mating habits, egg sac handling, and embryonic development between Nocticolidae and sister family Corydiidae suggested that the two groups share a common ancestor. Elucidating these relationships will help infer the evolutionary history of modern-day insects.

Recycling

Dayton Residents Risk Losing Curbside Recycling Service For Incorrect Recycling Habits

Take a trip back to the 1980s when recycling started gaining steam. School kids were informed to put their unneeded papers into boxes in the classroom. Those papers would get recycled. Bottles and glass became the next items being recycled. At the time, the focus was on keeping reusable materials out of overflowing landfills.Fast forward […]

Tiny beetles a bellwether of ecological disruption by climate change

New research shows that as species across the world adjust where they live in response to climate change, they will come into competition with other species that could hamper their ability to keep up with the pace of this change.

Uncategorized

Opinion | The alarming reality of global warming – The Breeze

The levels of greenhouse gas emissions are continuously and rapidly increasing, and with that increase comes dangerous and deadly consequences. The earth’s average temperature is expected to reach 1.5 degrees Celsius (34.7 degrees Fahrenheit) as soon as 2030, and with…

Opinion | The alarming reality of global warming – The Breeze

The levels of greenhouse gas emissions are continuously and rapidly increasing, and with that increase comes dangerous and deadly consequences. The earth’s average temperature is expected to reach 1.5 degrees Celsius (34.7 degrees Fahrenheit) as soon as 2030, and with…