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New temperature sensing mechanism in plants

Cell biologists reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light. As climate change warms the world, crop growth patterns and flowering times will change. A better understanding of how phytochromes regulate the seasonal rhythms of plant growth will help scientists develop crops for optimal growth under the new climate and might shed light on cancer in animals.

Oceans could return to a picture of health in just one generation

Our oceans face a number of threats, but if we act soon and act in concert, we can keep them healthy for future generations. (Photo: Nick Fewings [CC BY 2.0]/Flickr) Try to imagine the future as a tale of two…

How might climate change affect the spread of viruses? – Medical News Today

Predicting how future climate change will influence the spread of viral infections is fraught with difficulty. This is due to the complexity of interactions between climate, nature, and human activity. But annual fluctuations in some viral infections, such as seasonal…

Changes to drylands with future climate change

(Washington State University) While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. These regions, which primarily include savannas, grasslands and shrublands, are important for grazing and non-irrigated croplands. They are also a critical part of the global carbon cycle and make up 41% of Earth’s land surface and support 38% of its population.

Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction

(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction.

Extreme rainfall days in metropolitan São Paulo have risen four-fold in seven decades

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Study by researchers at Brazil’s National Disaster Surveillance and Early Warning Center (CEMADEN) also shows a rise in the number of consecutive dry days, suggesting that extreme rainfall events are concentrated in shorter, more widely spaced periods.

Study identifies new temperature sensing mechanism in plants

(University of California – Riverside) Cell biologists at the UC Riverside reveal the phytochrome B molecule has unexpected dynamics activated by temperature, and behaves differently depending on the temperature and type of light. As climate change warms the world, crop growth patterns and flowering times will change. A better understanding of how phytochromes regulate the seasonal rhythms of plant growth will help scientists develop crops for optimal growth under the new climate and might shed light on cancer in animals.

Ocean creatures keep millions of viruses at bay

The rainforest has long been a cradle for virus-kind. HIV, ebola and yellow fever all started out in those lush fortresses of biodiversity. But when it comes to harboring viruses, the rainforest has nothing on the ocean. Scientists have tallied…