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Emissions slashed today won’t slow warming until mid-century – The Economist

Jul 11th 2020 MUCH OF the international effort thus far to combat climate change has focused on cutting emissions of greenhouse gases, chief among them carbon dioxide. That is, of course, a rational approach. Global average temperatures are roughly 1.1°C…

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US push to dilute energy regulations as bailouts to fossil fuel firms

The US has argued for less regulation of the world’s energy systems, speaking out against the policy interventions promoting clean energy that are central to a “green recovery” from the coronavirus crisis. Dan Brouillette, the US energy secretary, told a…

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Scientists urge caution, further assessment of ecological impacts above deep sea mining

A new study argues that deep-sea mining poses significant risks, not only to the area immediately surrounding mining operations but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor, threatening vast midwater ecosystems. Further, the scientists suggest how these risks could be evaluated more comprehensively to enable society and managers to decide if and how deep-sea mining should proceed.

UN: World could hit 1.5-degree warming threshold by 2024 – ABC News

The U.N. weather agency says the world could see average global temperatures rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial average for the first time in the coming five years By NADINE ACHOUI-LESAGE and FRANK JORDANS Associated Press July 9,…

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Care for cats? So did people along the Silk Road more than 1,000 years ago

Common domestic cats, as we know them today, might have accompanied Kazakh pastoralists as pets more than 1,000 years ago. This is indicated by new analyses done on an almost complete cat skeleton found during an excavation along the former Silk Road in southern Kazakhstan. An international research team has reconstructed the cat’s life, revealing astonishing insights into the relationship between humans and pets at the time.

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DIPLOMACY: This group warned about warming in 1989. It still is

A 54-nation coalition is using the COVID-19 pandemic to research the impact of lower emissions on the environment. It is also scrambling to prepare the Caribbean for more violent weather and lay the groundwork for success at next year’s international climate change negotiations.

New evidence of long-term volcanic, seismic risks in northern Europe

(University of California – Los Angeles) An ancient European volcanic region may pose both a greater long-term volcanic risk and seismic risk to northwestern Europe than scientists had realized, geophysicists report in a study in the Geophysical Journal International. The densely populated area is centered in the Eifel region of Germany, and covers parts of Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Luxembourg.

New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass

(Aarhus University) Archaeological glass contains information about the movement of goods and ancient economies, yet the understanding of critical aspects of the ancient glass industry is fragmentary. Until now, it has been challenging to scientifically determine the origin of the colourless and clear glass, which was particularly favoured by the Romans. The Romans distinguished between two types of clear glass: Alexandrian and Levantine. Now researchers have found a way to localize the furnaces of the two types.

Advanced technology sheds new light on evolution of teeth

(Uppsala University) The evolution of our teeth began among ancient armoured fishes more than 400 million years ago. In the scientific journal Science, an international team led by researchers from Uppsala University presents ground-breaking findings about these earliest jawed vertebrates. Using powerful X-ray imaging, they show that unique fossils found near Prague contain surprisingly modern-looking teeth.