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Iceland honours Okjokull, its first glacier lost to global warming – FRANCE 24

Date created : 19/08/2019 – 06:13Latest update : 19/08/2019 – 09:03 Iceland on Sunday honoured the passing of Okjokull, its first glacier lost to climate change, as scientists warn that some 400 others on the subarctic island risk the same…

Scientists Discover How to Make Eco-Friendly Sunscreen From a Source of Food Waste: Cashew Shells

A team of international scientists has found an environmentally friendly way of producing potential sunscreens by using cashew nut shells, instead of discarding them as waste. The team of “green chemists” from the University of the Witwatersrand—along with colleagues from Universities in Germany, Malawi and Tanzania—have been working on techniques to produce useful compounds from […]

The post Scientists Discover How to Make Eco-Friendly Sunscreen From a Source of Food Waste: Cashew Shells appeared first on Good News Network.

A Growing Number of Americans Are Alarmed about Global Warming – Scientific American

When it comes to concern about global warming, the good news is that a growing number of Americans are alarmed. The bad news is that most still are not alarmed, though they should be given what we already know, how…

Scientists assess reliability of multiple precipitable water vapor datasets in Central Asia

(Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) Scientists evaluated multiple satellite and reanalysis precipitable water vapor (PWV) datasets against radiosonde observations in Central Asia. They further constructed a skill-weighted ensemble mean of the reanalysis datasets, based on the different performances of individual datasets.

Early species developed much faster than previously thought

When Earth’s species were rapidly diversifying nearly 500 million years ago, that evolution was driven by complex factors including global cooling, more oxygen in the atmosphere, and more nutrients in the oceans. But it took a combination of many global environmental and tectonic changes occurring simultaneously and combining like building blocks to produce rapid diversification into new species, according to a new study.