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Physicists say they’ve found a ‘tetraquark’

On July 1, scientists announced the discovery of a new exotic particle – a so-called “tetraquark” – a finding that marks a major breakthrough in a search of almost 20 years, carried out in particle physics labs all over the world.

PANIC! TIME Mag Says 2020 Is ‘One Last Chance’ To Save Planet

It’s the end of civilization. Again. Eco-extremists in the liberal media can’t even give themselves a 10-year gap for their end-of-the-world predictions. The latest Time magazine cover declared that 2020 is our last, best chance to save the planet. Run for…

The Planet’s Future Has Never Looked Brighter

Doomsday thinking about the environment has been popular for decades. A rational optimist lays out the many reasons we can be hopeful about the future of the planet. In 1980, the year that PERC was founded, I spent three months…

New method solves old mystery: Hafnium isotopes clinch origin of high-quality Roman glass

(Aarhus University) Archaeological glass contains information about the movement of goods and ancient economies, yet the understanding of critical aspects of the ancient glass industry is fragmentary. Until now, it has been challenging to scientifically determine the origin of the colourless and clear glass, which was particularly favoured by the Romans. The Romans distinguished between two types of clear glass: Alexandrian and Levantine. Now researchers have found a way to localize the furnaces of the two types.

Evolution makes the world less ragged

(University of Connecticut) How does evolution impact ecological patterns? It helps smooth out the rough edges, says UConn Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Professor Mark Urban. Urban led an international team of researchers through a review of the history of ecological and evolutionary research to establish a framework to better understand evolution’s impact on ecosystem patterns. The research is published as a perspective in the Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences.

A new look at deep-sea microbes

(University of Delaware) Microbes found deeper in the ocean are believed to have slow population turnover rates and low amounts of available energy. But a new examination of microbial communities found deeper in seafloor sediments and around hydrocarbon seepage sites has found they have more energy available and a higher population turnover. The deeper sediments in the seepages are most likely heavily impacted by the material coming up from the bottom, which means that the seep could be supporting a larger amount of biomass than previously thought.

To Defeat The Climate Cult, Realists Need To Unite, Speak Out

Much is made of the fact that former “climate change” advocates have now defected to the side of reason. But much more needs to be done to defeat climate change propaganda. The latest defection, as we’ve noted here, is Michael…

Our animal inheritance: Humans perk up their ears, too, when they hear interesting sounds

(Saarland University) Many animals move their ears to better focus their attention on a novel sound. That humans also have this capability was not known until now. A research team now has demonstrated that we make minute, unconscious movements of our ears that are directed towards the sound want to focus our attention on. The team discovered this ability by measuring electrical signals in the muscles of the vestigial motor system in the human ear. The results have now been published in the journal ‘eLife’.

Light a critical factor in limiting carbon uptake, especially in the north

(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) A new Columbia Engineering study demonstrates that even when temperatures warm and cold stress is limited, light is still a major factor in limiting carbon uptake of northern high latitudes. The team analyzed satellite observations, field measurements, and model simulations and showed that there is a prevalent radiation limitation on carbon uptake in northern ecosystems, especially in autumn.