Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Insects

In fire-prone West, plants need their pollinators — and vice versa

A new study grounded in the northern Rockies explores the role of wildfire in the finely tuned dance between plants and their pollinators. Previous studies have looked at how fire affects plants, or how fire affects animals. But what is largely understudied is the question of how fire affects both, and about how linkages within those ecological networks might respond to fire disturbance. The findings are particularly significant in light of recent reports about the rapid and widespread decline of insects globally.

Clean Air Act saved 1.5 billion birds

US pollution regulations meant to protect humans from dirty air are also saving birds. So concludes a new continent-wide study. Study authors found that improved air quality under a federal program to reduce ozone pollution may have averted the loss of 1.5 billion birds during the past 40 years.

Uncategorized

Decoding gigantic insect genome could help tackle devastating locust crises

A ‘game changing’ study deciphering the genetic material of the desert locust could help combat the crop-ravaging behavior of the notorious insect pest which currently exacerbates a hunger crisis across many developing countries.

Decoding gigantic insect genome could help tackle devastating locust crises

A ‘game changing’ study deciphering the genetic material of the desert locust could help combat the crop-ravaging behavior of the notorious insect pest which currently exacerbates a hunger crisis across many developing countries.

Researchers reveal switch used in plant defense against animal attack

Researchers have identified the first key biological switch that sounds an alarm in plants when plant-eating animals attack. The mechanism will help unlock a trove of new strategies for improved plant health, from countering crop pest damage to engineering more robust global food webs.

Moths strike out in evolutionary arms race with sophisticated wing design

(University of Bristol) Ultra-thin, super-absorbent and extraordinarily designed to detract attention, the wings of moths could hold the key for developing technological solutions to survive in a noisy world.

Very hungry and angry, caterpillars head-butt to get what they want

When food is scarce, monarch butterfly caterpillars go from docile to domineering. The results look something like a combination of boxing and ‘bumper’ cars. The less food, the more likely caterpillars were to try to head-butt each other out of the way to get their fill, lunging and knocking aside other caterpillars to ensure their own survival. And, they are most aggressive right before the final stages of their metamorphosis.

Health trade-offs for wildlife as urbanization expands

City living appears to improve reproductive success for migratory tree swallows compared to breeding in more environmentally protected areas, a new five-year study suggests. But urban life comes with a big trade-off – health hazards linked to poorer water quality.

Studies focus on SARS-CoV-2 transmission in domestic cats, pigs

Two recently published studies include important findings related to SARS-CoV-2 transmission and the COVID-19 pandemic: Domestic cats can be asymptomatic carriers of SARS-CoV-2, but pigs are unlikely to be significant carriers of the virus.