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News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Scientists create model to measure how cells sense their surroundings

Our body’s ability to detect disease, foreign material, and the location of food sources and toxins is all determined by a cocktail of chemicals that surround our cells, as well as our cells’ ability to ‘read’ these chemicals. Cells are highly sensitive. In fact, our immune system can be triggered by the presence of just one foreign molecule or ion. Yet researchers don’t know how cells achieve this level of sensitivity.

Coral tells own tale about El Niño’s past

(Rice University) Rice University and Georgia Tech scientists use data from ancient coral to build a record of temperatures in the tropical Pacific Ocean over the last millennium. The data question previous links between volcanic eruptions and El Niño events.

The Analogy Between Covid-19 and Climate Change Is Eerily Precise – WIRED

For a brief moment there, it looked as though the coronavirus pandemic might escape the muck of partisanship. It’s true that President Donald Trump, wary of a recession during a reelection year, had first tried to talk the virus into…

In Just 10 Years, Warming Has Increased the Odds of Disasters – Scientific American

Small levels of global warming can increase the likelihood of extreme events, new research warns. That’s prompting scientists to question how accurately disasters in the recent past can be used to predict extreme events today. A study published Wednesday in Science Advances suggests that…

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Observing phytoplankton via satellite

Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and the ramifications for the fishing industry.

Global human genomes reveal rich genetic diversity shaped by complex evolutionary history

(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A new study has provided the most comprehensive analysis of human genetic diversity to date, after the sequencing of 929 human genomes by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators. The study uncovers a large amount of previously undescribed genetic variation and provides new insights into our evolutionary past, highlighting the complexity of the process through which our ancestors diversified, migrated and mixed throughout the world.

Observing phytoplankton via satellite

(Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research) Thanks to a new algorithm, researchers at the AWI can now use satellite data to determine in which parts of the ocean certain types of phytoplankton are dominant. In addition, they can identify toxic algal blooms and assess the effects of global warming on marine plankton, allowing them to draw conclusions regarding water quality and the ramifications for the fishing industry.