Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Greenhouse gases could fall to levels not seen since WWII

Clear skies ahead. These days, you’ll be forgiven for hoping those words refer to the end of a pandemic that has forced millions to hunker down indoors. But in this case, those clear skies are literal. And when we finally…

How might climate change affect the spread of viruses? – Medical News Today

Predicting how future climate change will influence the spread of viral infections is fraught with difficulty. This is due to the complexity of interactions between climate, nature, and human activity. But annual fluctuations in some viral infections, such as seasonal…

Deserted beaches are a boon to sea turtles during nesting season

Images of empty beaches around the globe may seem strange to us, but to nesting sea turtles, the view has never looked better. Conservation officials tasked with managing nesting sites are reporting an increase in the number of female turtles…

Northern peatlands will lose some of their CO2 sink capacity under a warmer climate

(University of Eastern Finland) A Nordic study sheds new light on the role of northern peatlands in regulating the regional climate. According to the researchers, peatlands will remain carbon sinks until the end of this century, but their sink capacity will be substantially reduced after 2050, if the climate warms significantly.

Unsustainable food systems: Can we reverse current trends?

(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) As rural masses migrate to urban areas, populations grow, and people work toward better living standards, global food system sustainability pays a high price, according to a new scientific analysis spanning low- to high-income countries. The study shows that only one major global driver –international trade — appears to have a net positive effect on global food systems sustainability. Other major drivers (population growth, urbanization, lifestyle change, changes in land use) seem to have negative effects.

Extreme rainfall days in metropolitan São Paulo have risen four-fold in seven decades

(Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo) Study by researchers at Brazil’s National Disaster Surveillance and Early Warning Center (CEMADEN) also shows a rise in the number of consecutive dry days, suggesting that extreme rainfall events are concentrated in shorter, more widely spaced periods.

Removing the novel coronavirus from the water cycle

(University of California – Riverside) Researchers at UC Riverside and the University of Salerno have called for more research to determine the best ways to keep SARS-CoV-19 out of the water cycle. They also suggest that developed nations should finance water treatment systems in the developing world to help prevent future COVID-19 pandemics.

Changes to drylands with future climate change

(Washington State University) While drylands around the world will expand at an accelerated rate because of future climate change, their average productivity will likely be reduced, according to a new study. These regions, which primarily include savannas, grasslands and shrublands, are important for grazing and non-irrigated croplands. They are also a critical part of the global carbon cycle and make up 41% of Earth’s land surface and support 38% of its population.

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COVID-19 vaccine candidate shows promise, research shows

Scientists have announced a potential vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus causing the COVID-19 pandemic. When tested in mice, the vaccine — delivered through a fingertip-sized patch — produces antibodies specific to SARS-CoV-2 at quantities thought to be sufficient for neutralizing the virus.