Menopausal Mother Nature

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Tesla Inside Out — Tesla History From 7-Year Insider

I recently met a gentleman named David Havasi while charging our Tesla Model 3 at a ChargePoint station at a Whole Foods I frequently visit. He recognized me from CleanTechnica and I quickly learned he worked at Tesla for 7 years, until just recently. We got talking, talking, talking, and talking. I wasn’t sure if he’d be camera shy to repeat some of what he told me (or more) on camera, but it turned out he very much wasn’t shy — he had actually worked on Broadway before working at Tesla!

Hurricanes affecting Puerto Rico reveal the serious crisis the country is experiencing

(Universitat Pompeu Fabra – Barcelona) An article led by Joan Benach, a researcher with the Department of Political and Social Sciences at UPF, published in the journal ‘Social Science & Medicine’, shows how the underlying causes of the crisis in Puerto Rico stem from colonialism and the lack of political sovereignty.

Early dispersal for quadrupedal cetaceans: amphibious whale from middle Eocene

(Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology) Lead author, Olivier Lambert, Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences, Bruxelles, Belgium, presented the team’s findings at this year’s annual meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology held this year in Brisbane, Australia.

Fossil suggests apes, old world monkeys moved in opposite directions from shared ancestor

(American Museum of Natural History) In terms of their body plan, Old World monkeys — a group that includes primates like baboons and macaques — are generally considered more similar to ancestral species than apes are. But a new study suggests that as far as locomotion goes, apes and Old World monkeys each evolved a way of moving that was different from the ancestral species as they adapted to different niches in their environments.

Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity

(University of Vienna) Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets – for instance, relatively little is known about where the city’s denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City’s populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

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Researchers lay out first genetic history of Rome

Despite extensive records of the history of Rome, little is known about the city’s population over time. A new genetic history of the Eternal City reveals a dynamic population shaped in part by political and historical events.

Yankees Hire Climate Activist To Excite Fans About Global Warming

Allen Hershkowitz hopes to make climate change a regular feature on the sports pages of American media whether fans like it or not. And the new environmental science adviser for the New York Yankees hopes to convince people to embrace…

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Mammals’ complex spines are linked to high metabolisms; we’re learning how they evolved

Mammals’ backbones are weird. They’re much more complex than the spines of other land animals like reptiles. Scientists wanted to find out how these complex backbones evolved in the first place. They discovered that the process was marked by big, dramatic evolutionary changes, and that it’s linked to mammals being active animals with high metabolisms.

New Zealand zero carbon Bill shows bipartisan leadership

Historic moment for New Zealand as the New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinta Ardern calls near unanimous support for a Zero Carbon bill as acting on the biggest challenge of our time. “I continue to stand by the statement that #ClimateChange…