Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Harvard

This new blood test accurately predicts 50 types of cancer

An international team of scientists may have made a major breakthrough in early cancer detection: a blood test that finds more than 50 types of cancer, including specific locations in the body. They did it with a little help from…

6 questions pet owners are asking during the COVID-19 pandemic

Many pet owners are spending a lot more time at home these days, and they have lots of questions about how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting their animals and their daily activities. Here are some answers. Is my dog stressed…

Could coronavirus 'immunity passports' get people working again?

Germany is floating an idea that might get millions of people back to work after the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The country’s public health agency, in partnership with research groups and hospitals, will conduct a massive study this…

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Most of Earth’s carbon was hidden in the core during its formative years

Carbon is essential for life as we know it and plays a vital role in many of our planet’s geologic processes — not to mention the impact that carbon released by human activity has on the planet’s atmosphere and oceans. Despite this, the total amount of carbon on Earth remains a mystery, because much of it remains inaccessible in the planet’s depths.

Most of Earth’s carbon was hidden in the core during its formative years

(Smithsonian) A team of scientists reports March 30 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences how carbon behaved during Earth’s violent formative period. The findings can help scientists understand how much carbon likely exists in the planet’s core and the ways it influences chemical and dynamic activities that shape the world, including the convective motion that powers the magnetic field that protects Earth from cosmic radiation.

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Extreme, high temperatures may double or triple heart-related deaths

In Kuwait, a country known for hot weather, death certificates reveal that on days when the temperatures reached extremes of an average daily temperature of 109 degrees Fahrenheit, the number of deaths from cardiovascular disease dramatically increased. With unprecedentedly high temperatures, people living in inherently hot regions of the world may be at particularly high risk of heat-related cardiovascular death.

Truckers are the unsung heroes of this pandemic

There’s no shortage of people facing extraordinary adversity to help us maintain some semblance of civilization in these pandemic times. There are the usual suspects — doctors, nurses, firefighters — who make courage under fire seem so routine. And then…

Why approaching comet ATLAS is so bright (and how you can see it)

A newly discovered comet named ATLAS is on track to become one of the brightest comets to grace our night skies since Hale-Bopp in 1997. Officially known as C/2019 Y4, the comet was nicknamed ATLAS in honor of the Asteroid…

Homeless pets need your help as coronavirus closes shelters

There are so many obvious victims of the COVID-19 pandemic, but there are plenty that aren’t as apparent. Animal shelters and rescues are among those impacted but the coronavirus. As more people across the United States are being told to…