Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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What can a dinosaur’s inner ear tell us? Just listen

(Yale University) New Haven, Conn. — If paleontologists had a wish list, it would almost certainly include insights into two particular phenomena: how dinosaurs interacted with each other and how they began to fly.

Physicists describe new type of aurora

(University of Iowa) The famed northern and southern lights have been studied for millennia, but they still hold secrets. In a new study, physicists led by the University of Iowa describe a new phenomenon they call “diffuse auroral erasers,” in which patches of the background glow are blotted out, then suddenly intensify and reappear.

Climate Summit ‘Last Chance’ for Brazil to Show Leadership on Global Warming – InsideClimate News

WASHINGTON—President Joe Biden’s climate summit of 40 world leaders this week will be Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro’s “last chance” to restore Washington’s confidence in Brazil’s commitment to taking action to fight climate change, the U.S. ambassador to Brazil has warned….

URI oceanographers reveal links between migrating Gulf Stream and warming ocean waters

(University of Rhode Island) The Northwest Atlantic Shelf is one of the fastest-changing regions in the global ocean, and is currently experiencing marine heat waves, altered fisheries and a surge in sea level rise along the North American east coast. A new paper authored by experts at the University of Rhode Island and published in Communications Earth & Environment reveals the causes, potential predictability and historical context for these types of rapid changes.

Learning From California’s Ambitious Climate Policy – Center For American Progress

Introduction and summary Subscribe to InProgress California has long been synonymous with effective climate policy. Beginning in 2001, the Golden State established its first voluntary emissions reporting program under Gov. Gray Davis (D). Subsequently, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) built on…

Compounds in Amber Could Help Fight Drug-Resistant Bacteria Superbugs, Scientists Find

For centuries, people in Baltic nations have used ancient amber for medicinal purposes. Even today, infants are given amber necklaces that they chew to relieve teething pain, and people put pulverized amber in elixirs and ointments for its purported anti-inflammatory and anti-infective properties. Now, scientists have pinpointed compounds that help explain Baltic amber’s therapeutic effects […]

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How did 500 species of a fish form in a lake? Dramatically different body clocks

(Florida Atlantic University) Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi’s cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity.

Houston flooding polluted reefs more than 100 miles offshore

(Rice University) Extreme storm flooding in Houston washed human waste onto coral reefs more than 100 miles offshore. Rice University marine biologists found fecal bacteria on sponges in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary following 2016’s Tax Day flood and 2017’s Hurricane Harvey.