Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

Geology

Lacustrine ecosystems needed 10 million years to recover after end-permian mass extinction

(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research team led by Prof. WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) found that both lake and peat-forming forest ecosystems probably took as long as 10 million years to recover after the end-Permian mass extinction.

Uncategorized

Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too

Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa.

Uncategorized

Neanderthals ate mussels, fish, and seals too

Over 80,000 years ago, Neanderthals fed themselves on mussels, fish and other marine life. The first evidence has been found by an international team in the cave of Figueira Brava in Portugal. The excavated layers date from 86,000 to 106,000 years ago, the period when Neanderthals settled in Europe. Sourcing food from the sea at that time had only been attributed to anatomically modern humans in Africa.

Wonderchicken fossil casts new light on bird evolution

The oldest known bird fossil, from the age of dinosaurs, has skull features similar to modern chickens. The scientists who found it have nicknamed it “Wonderchicken.” It’s providing valuable insights into the evolution of birds.

Track latest hydrological situation across the UK via new portal

(UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology ) The new UK Water Resources Portal provides the most up-to-date available data on river flows, rainfall, soil moisture and groundwater levels from a local to a national scale. The free, interactive online tool has been developed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH).

Earth Saved?: How Blocking out the Sun May Help Reduce Global Warming – The National Interest

Solar radiation management is a controversial and theoretical proposal for addressing some of the risks of climate change. The Conversation Africa’s Energy and Environment editor Samantha Spooner asked experts Asfawossen Asrat and Andy Parker about solar radiation management and the…

Ancestor of all animals identified in Australian fossils

(University of California – Riverside) A team led by UC Riverside geologists has discovered the first ancestor on the family tree that contains most animals today, including humans. The wormlike creature, Ikaria wariootia, is the earliest bilaterian, or organism with a front and back, two symmetrical sides, and openings at either end connected by a gut. It was found in Ediacaran Period deposits in Australia and was 2-7 millimeters long, with the largest the size of a grain of rice.

FSU Research: Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast

(Florida State University) FSU researcher Robert Spencer co-authored a study that showed evidence of undetected concentrations and flows of dissolved organic matter entering Arctic coastal waters, coming from groundwater flows on top of frozen permafrost. This water moves from land to sea unseen, but researchers now believe it carries significant concentrations of carbon and other nutrients to Arctic coastal food webs.

Hidden source of carbon found at the Arctic coast

(University of Texas at Austin) A previously unknown significant source of carbon just discovered in the Arctic has scientists marveling at a once overlooked contributor to local coastal ecosystems — and concerned about what it may mean in an era of climate change.

Shedding light on how much carbon tropical forests can absorb

(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Tropical forest ecosystems are an important part of the global carbon cycle as they take up and store large amounts of CO2. It is however uncertain how much these forests’ ability to take up and store carbon differ between forests with high versus low species richness. New IIASA research sheds light on this question aiming to enhance our ability to predict tropical ecosystems’ strength as global carbon sinks.