Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

forecasting

NASA finds wind shear battering tropical storm Edouard

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The latest tropical storm in the Atlantic Ocean formed one day ago and was already being battered by wind shear. NASA’s Aqua satellite imagery revealed Tropical Storm Edouard’s strongest storms were being displaced by strong southwesterly winds.

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite sees Tropical Storm Boris form

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with visible image of the Eastern Pacific Ocean’s second tropical storm of the season, Boris. Boris formed just east of the Central Pacific Ocean’s boundary as it was moving into that region.

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Oil forecasting technique adapted for spreadsheets may cut shale operator costs

Porous rock containing oil and natural gas are buried so deep inside the earth that shale operators rely on complex models of the underground environment to estimate fossil fuel recovery. These simulations are notoriously complex, requiring highly-skilled operators to run them. These factors indirectly impact the cost of shale oil production and ultimately, how much consumers pay for their fuel.

Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise.

NASA catches development of Tropical Cyclone Nuri in South China Sea

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) A low-pressure system that developed in the Philippine Sea and tracked over the central Philippines has moved into the South China Sea and become a depression. NASA’s Terra satellite provided an image of the newly formed storm.

COVID Vs. Climate Models: Cloudy With A Chance Of Politics

COVID-19 has proved to be a crisis not only for public health but for public policy. As credentialed experts, media commentators, and elected officials have insisted that ordinary men and women heed “the science,” the statistical models cited by scientists…

NASA infrared imagery indicates cristobal’s heavy rainmaking capabilities

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) One of the ways NASA observes tropical cyclones is by using infrared data that provides temperature information and indicates storm strength. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered that data and revealed Cristobal has the potential to generate heavy rainfall. That rainfall is now soaking Mexico and portions of Central America as Cristobal meanders.

NASA finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Cristobal

(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) The third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic Ocean basin has been generating large amounts of rainfall over Mexico’s Yucatan and parts of Central America. Using satellite data, NASA analyzed that heavy rainfall and provided forecasters with valuable cloud top temperature data to help assess the strength of the storm.