Menopausal Mother Nature

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Ginkgo Trees Were Going Extinct on Their Own; Then Humans Saved These ‘Living Fossils’ So They’re Now Everywhere

Lining the streets of many American city suburbs are living fossils, which unlike many stories of man’s interaction with nature, involves nature as the destroyer, and mankind, the savior. While some people take ginkgo leaf as a nootropic supplement, few people would imagine it’s the equivalent of eating a horseshoe crab, that is to say it’s […]

The post Ginkgo Trees Were Going Extinct on Their Own; Then Humans Saved These ‘Living Fossils’ So They’re Now Everywhere appeared first on Good News Network.

2020: Hottest Year On Record

NASA data show that 2020 was the hottest year on record. The image below shows that high temperature in 2020 hit Siberia and the Arctic Ocean. In above images, the temperature anomaly is compared to 1951-1980, NASA’s default baseline. When…

Climate change doesn’t spare the insects

Entomologists have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They are sharing new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and they are coming up with a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It’s a model they hope catches on and spreads around the globe.

How plants produce defensive toxins without harming themselves

Scientists describe the biosynthesis and exact mode of action of diterpene glycosides in wild tobacco. These antiherbivory compounds attack the cell membrane. To protect themselves from their own toxins, tobacco plants store them in a non-toxic form. Autotoxicity and the protection against it seem to play a greater role in the evolution of plant defenses than previously thought.

Hard to crack research reveals how crop roots penetrate hard soils

Scientists have discovered a signal that causes roots to stop growing in hard soils which can be ‘switched off’ to allow them to punch through compacted soil — a discovery that could help plants to grow in even the most damaged soils.

Measuring the belowground world

Life above ground depends on the soil and its countless inhabitants. Yet, global strategies to protect biodiversity have so far paid little attention to this habitat. Researchers call for greater consideration of soils in international biodiversity strategies, far beyond agriculture. The researchers explain their plan for systematic recording to enable comprehensive policy advisory.