Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

fisheries

Researchers prove fish-friendly detection method more sensitive than electrofishing

Delivering a minor electric shock into a stream to reveal any fish lurking nearby may be the gold standard for detecting fish populations, but it’s not much fun for the trout. Scientists have found that sampling stream water for evidence of the presence of various species using environmental DNA, known as eDNA, can be more accurate than electrofishing, without disrupting the fish.

Making protein ‘superfood’ from marine algae

(Flinders University) Marine microalgae-based cellular agriculture is a promising new way to sustainably produce plant-based ‘meat’ and healthy ‘superfoods’ for the future.Researchers at Flinders University’s Centre for Marine Bioproducts Development (CMBD) in Australia are responding to growing interest from consumers looking for healthier, more environmentally friendly, sustainable and ethical alternatives to animal proteins.

This Great Lakes fish may have evolved to see like its ocean ancestors did

(University at Buffalo) In the dark waters of Lake Superior, a fish species adapted to regain a genetic trait that may have helped its ancient ancestors see in the ocean, a study finds. “Evolution is often thought of as a one-way process, at least over deep time, but in this example, over 175 million years, we have this reversal back to a much earlier ancestral state,” one of the researchers says.

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Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue

Researchers successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.

Uncategorized

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue

Researchers successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue

Researchers successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.