Menopausal Mother Nature

News about Climate Change and our Planet

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Politics

Will the First Amendment Die in the Aftermath of January 6?

I have gone about a week now without even opening Twitter, which makes me both mentally healthier as well as slower to post my thoughts on various issues.  But those who were reading me on Twitter earlier in the month…

Amber-encased fossil shines light on evolution of bioluminescent insects

Trapped in amber for ~100 million years, an exceptionally well-preserved, light-producing beetle sheds light on the diversification of bioluminescent beetles in the Cretaceous period and provides the missing fossil link between fireflies’ living relatives.

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Boston Globe Falsely Claims Global Warming Is ‘Accelerating’

The Boston Globe published an article yesterday claiming global temperatures are rising at an accelerating pace. The objective data, however, show that is not the case. The Globe’s readers deserve factual reporting, not agenda-driven climate activism. The Globe’s article is…

Climate change doesn’t spare the insects

Entomologists have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They are sharing new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and they are coming up with a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It’s a model they hope catches on and spreads around the globe.

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Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group

Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels. Researchers witnessed the electric eels working together to herd small fish into tightly packed balls. Groups of up to 10 eels periodically split off to form cooperative hunting parties. Those smaller groups then surrounded the prey and launched simultaneous electric attacks. The findings overturn the idea that these serpentine fish are exclusively solitary predators.

Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group

Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels. Researchers witnessed the electric eels working together to herd small fish into tightly packed balls. Groups of up to 10 eels periodically split off to form cooperative hunting parties. Those smaller groups then surrounded the prey and launched simultaneous electric attacks. The findings overturn the idea that these serpentine fish are exclusively solitary predators.

Uncategorized

Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group

Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels. Researchers witnessed the electric eels working together to herd small fish into tightly packed balls. Groups of up to 10 eels periodically split off to form cooperative hunting parties. Those smaller groups then surrounded the prey and launched simultaneous electric attacks. The findings overturn the idea that these serpentine fish are exclusively solitary predators.